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I have a mthod by many if and else. How can i convert it by Switch?

protected override IRepository<T> CreateRepository<T>()
{
   if (typeof(T).Equals(typeof(Person)))
      return new PersonRepositoryNh(this, SessionInstance) as IRepository<T>;
   else if (typeof(T).Equals(typeof(Organization)))
      return new OrganizationRepositoryNh(this, SessionInstance) as IRepository<T>;
   else
      return new RepositoryNh<T>(SessionInstance);
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

According to the specification, only sbyte, byte, short, ushort, int, uint, long, ulong, char, string, or enum-types can be used in a switch statement, so basically you can not switch on a type object.

Now, what you can do is switching on the Name of the type, that's just a string and it's ok to switch on it.

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Thanks. But use Name is Hard Code and is not suitable. –  Ehsan Dec 4 '11 at 5:57

You cannot use a switch statement for type Type. You can only use a switch with bool, char, string, integral, and enum, or the nullable versions of them.

Per the compiler:

A switch expression or case label must be a bool, char, string, integral, enum, or corresponding nullable type

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You can't. The case statements for a switch must be compile-time constants, of type sbyte, byte, short, ushort, int, uint, long, ulong, char, string, or an enum-type (including implicit conversions), and that's not what you have with the Type objects.

What is legal:

switch (foo)
{
    case 42:
       // code
       break;
}

What is not legal:

int value = GetValue(); // not a verifiable compile-time constant

switch (foo)
{
     case value: 
         // code
         break;
}
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typeof(something) is compile time –  Dani Dec 4 '11 at 4:54
    
typeof(something) is also not one of the supported types, nor is it implicitly convertible to one of the supported types. –  Anthony Pegram Dec 4 '11 at 4:56
  1. are you sure you want to do it like this? Why not to use object hierarchy and virtual functions?

  2. this code works

public static void CreateTest<T>()
{
    switch (typeof(T).Name)
    {
        case "Int32": System.Console.WriteLine("int");
            break;
        case "String": System.Console.WriteLine("string");
            break;

    }

}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    CreateTest<int>();
    CreateTest<string>();
    CreateTest<double>();

}
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