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I am building a website in which the main content frame should span the entire width of the page, and as much height as necessary, with a minimum height (in order to contain a floating "sidebar" of sorts). However, setting the width of the div element to 100% doesn't fill the window, it over-fills it, creating a horizontal scroll-bar. Is there any way to have the content div stretch to the full width of the page and no more, without clipping from the sides or bottom, as with box sizing or overflow settings?

Thank you for your time, Timothy S.
base.css

html, body {
    margin:0;
    padding:0;

    font-family: "Lucida Grande", Verdana;
    font-size: 0.9em;

    background-color:#4D714D;
    background-image:url("images/titlebar.png");
    background-attachment:fixed;
    background-repeat:no-repeat;
    background-position:0px 7px;
}

div.content
{
    position:relative;
    top: 150px;

    padding: 20px;

    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;

    width:100%;
    min-height:500px;

    background-color:#8BB88B;   
}

div.sidebar
{   
    float:right;

    position:relative;
    top:-20px;
    left:20px;

    width: 400px;
    height: 400px;

    background-color:#FFFFFF;   
}


example page

<html>
    <head>
        <title>Login</title>
        <link type="text/css" href="base.css" rel="stylesheet" />       
    </head>

    <body>
        <div class="content">
            <div class="sidebar"></div>
            <form action="loginScript.php" method="post">
                <label>Username:</label>
                <input type="text" name="username" /> <br />
                <label>Password:</label>
                <input type="password" name="password" /> <br />
                <input type="submit" value="Login" name="login" />
            </form>
            <?php print($_GET['msg']) ?>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The layout you described is the default behavior of a block element, such as a div. That it is not displaying that way indicates that you have overridden the default. Indeed, the culprit is width: 100%. You can safely remove that from your CSS.

Your question is a perfect example of why I take a minimalist approach to CSS. Only apply a style when you are sure you need it. That way, when your page doesn't display the way you expect, you have less to debug.

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Ah, thank you very much - done a good bit of trimming now. –  Timothy S. Dec 4 '11 at 14:11

The extra spacing is coming from the padding on div.content. Change it to:

padding: 20px 0;

Also, from the relatively positioned div.sidebar. Get rid of left:20px;

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Thank you for your answer, I didn't realize the 100% only referred to the content and not the rest of the box model. –  Timothy S. Dec 4 '11 at 14:14

The width of an element does not include border, margin, and padding. So it is actually making the width 100% + everything else (20px right and 20px left for padding, etc). Your division is already block-level and it doesn't appear you're removing that status, so you should completely remove the width as a block-level element, by default, with already expand to fill as much width as possible (and will not include the padding and other things).

Also, if your division is meant to expand to the entire width of the page, you don't need set the left and right margins to auto.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the explanation. I hadn't even considered the rest of the box model.... Good spot with the second bit as well; I had initially tried a centered layout and decided against it, seems I forgot to remove that bit. Thanks. –  Timothy S. Dec 4 '11 at 14:13

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