Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a file, x, with section delimiters:

The first section

#!

The second section

#!

The third section

And I want to split it up into a sequence of separate files, like:

The first section
#!

The second section
#!

The third section

I thought csplit would be the solution, with a command-line something like:

$ csplit -sk x '/#!/' {9999}

But the second file (xx01) ends up containing both delimiters:

#!

The second section

#!

Any ideas for how to accomplish what I want in a POSIX compliant way? (Yes, I could reach for Perl/Python/Ruby and friends; but, the point is to stretch my shell knowledge.)


I worry that I've found a bug in OSX csplit. Can people give the following a go and let me know the results?

#!/bin/sh

test -e

work="$(basename $0).$RANDOM"
mkdir $work

csplit -sk -f "$work/" - '/#/' '{9999}' <<EOF
First
#
Second
#
Third
EOF

if [ $(grep -c '#' $work/01) -eq 2 ]; then
  echo FAIL Repeat
else
  echo PASS Repeat
fi

rm $work/*

csplit -sk -f "$work/" - '/#/' '/#/' <<EOF
First
#
Second
#
Third
EOF

if [ $(grep -c '#' $work/01) -eq 2 ]; then
  echo FAIL Exact
else
  echo PASS Exact
fi

uname -a

When I run it on my Snow Leopard box, I get:

$ ./csplit-test
csplit: #: no match
FAIL Repeat
PASS Exact
Darwin lani.bigpond 11.2.0 Darwin Kernel Version 11.2.0: Tue Aug  9 20:54:00 PDT 2011; root:xnu-1699.24.8~1/RELEASE_X86_64 x86_64

And on my Debian box, I get:

$ sh ./csplit-test 
csplit: `/#/': match not found on repetition 2
PASS Repeat
PASS Exact
share|improve this question
    
Testing this out using your exact setup gives me the result you're looking for. I'm using csplit (GNU coreutils) 8.5 –  OmnipotentEntity Dec 4 '11 at 6:45
    
That's bad. I'm using OSX csplit. –  Scott Robinson Dec 4 '11 at 7:12

4 Answers 4

Using awk and testing it in a linux machine:

My version of awk:

$ awk --version | head -1
GNU Awk 4.0.0

Content of infile:

$ cat infile
The first section

#!

The second section

#!

The third section

Content of the awk script:

$ cat script.awk
BEGIN {
        ## Set 'Input Record Separator' variable.
        RS = "#!";
}

{
        ## Set an integer variable as output file name.
        ++filenum;
}

## For first section.
FNR == 1 {
        ## Remove leading and trailing spaces.
        sub( /^\s+/, "", $0);
        sub( /\s+$/, "", $0);

        ## Print to output file.
        printf "%s\n", $0 > filenum ".txt"
}

## For sections from second one to last one.
FNR > 1 {
        ## Remove trailing spaces.
        sub( /\s+$/, "", $0);

        ## Print to output file.
        printf "%s%s\n", RS, $0 > filenum ".txt"
}

Running the script:

$ awk -f script.awk infile

Check output:

$ ls [0-9].txt
1.txt  2.txt  3.txt
$ cat 1.txt 
The first section
$ cat 2.txt 
#!

The second section
$ cat 3.txt 
#!

The third section
share|improve this answer

Though not ideal, but you can do something like this with awk.

Your file:

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat f0
The first section

#!

The second section

#!

The third section

Get everything before #! using this (you can redirect this in a file)

[jaypal:~/Temp] awk '/#!/{exit;}1' f0 
The first section

Get #! followed by the content and split before the next #!.

[jaypal:~/Temp] awk '/^#!/{x++}{print >(x".txt")}' f0
[jaypal:~/Temp] ls *.txt
1.txt 2.txt
[jaypal:~/Temp] cat 1.txt 
#!

The second section

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat 2.txt 
#!

The third section

You might get an easy way around with perl using something like this -

#!/usr/bin/perl

undef $/;
$_ = <>;
$n = 0;

for $match (split(/(?=#!)/)) {
      open(O, '>temp' . ++$n);
      print O $match;
      close(O);
}

Files created by script:

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat temp1 
The first section

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat temp2 
#!

The second section

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat temp3 
#!

The third section
share|improve this answer

Uh oh. (FreeBSD 8.1 install running in a Parallels VM)

src ./test_split.sh
csplit: #: no match
FAIL Repeat
PASS Exact
FreeBSD <hostname> 8.1-RELEASE FreeBSD 8.1-RELEASE #0: Mon Jul 19 02:55:53 UTC 2010 root@almeida.cse.buffalo.edu:/usr/obj/usr/src/sys/GENERIC i386
share|improve this answer

this seems to work for me on LINUX:

csplit -sk filename '/#!/' {*}

giving:

$ more xx00
The first section

$ more xx01
#!

The second section

$ more xx02
#!

The third section

you could also use Ruby or Perl to do this in a tiny script, and get rid of the delimiters all together


on Fedora 13 Linux:

$ ./test.sh 
csplit: `/#/': match not found on repetition 2
PASS Repeat
PASS Exact
Linux localhost.localdomain 2.6.34.8-68.fc13.x86_64 #1 SMP Thu Feb 17 15:03:58 UTC 2011 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
share|improve this answer
    
I want the delimiters. –  Scott Robinson Dec 4 '11 at 7:34
    
then the above should work.. –  Tilo Dec 4 '11 at 7:37
    
I just added a test. Can you run it and let me know the results? –  Scott Robinson Dec 4 '11 at 8:02
    
see above results –  Tilo Dec 4 '11 at 8:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.