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I have code which uses ScriptEngineManager, ScriptEngine class for executing JavaScript code using Java. But it works fine in Java SE, and doesn't work in Android - SDK show error of missing classes. Is it possible to execute JS code in Android? Thank you.

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FYI, if the search engine is broken I am sure google will find a couple of the duplicates in here. The "related" block to the right lists at least one of them. –  Fredrik Dec 4 '11 at 7:57
    
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7 Answers 7

You can use Webview which inherits View class. Make an XML tag and use findViewById() function to use in the activity. But to use the JavaScript, you can make a HTML file containing the JavaScript code. The example blelow might help.

Webview browser=(Webview) findViewById(R.main.browser); //if you gave the id as browser
browser.getSettings().setJavaScriptEnabled(true); //Yes you have to do it
browser.loadUrl("file:///android_asset/JsPage.html"); //If you put the HTML file in asset folder of android

Remember that the JS will run on WebView, not in native environment, thus you might experience a lag or slow FPS in emulator. However when using on an actual phone, the code may run fast, depending on how fast is your phone.

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http://divineprogrammer.blogspot.com/2009/11/javascript-rhino-on-android.html will get you started. ScriptEngine is a java thing. Android doesn't have a JVM but a DalvikVM which is not identical but similar.

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The javax.script package is not part of the Android SDK. You can execute JavaScript in a WebView, as described here. You perhaps can use Rhino, as described here. You might also take a look at the Scripting Layer for Android project.

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Here is a little library I wrote for evaluating JavaScript:

https://github.com/evgenyneu/js-evaluator-for-android

jsEvaluator.evaluate("function hello(){ return 'Hello world!'; } hello();", new JsCallback() {
  @Override
  public void onResult(final String result) {
    // get result here (optional)
  }
});

It creates a WebView behind the scenes. Works on Android version 3 and newer.

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Given that ScriptEngineManager and ScriptEngine are part of the JDK and Android SDK is not the same thing as the JDK I would say that you can't use these classes to work with JavaScript under Android.

You can check the Android SDK's reference documentation/package index to see what classes are included (what can you work on Android out of the box) and which of them are missing.

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AndroidJSCore is an Android Java JNI wrapper around Webkit's JavaScriptCore C library. It is inspired by the Objective-C JavaScriptCore Framework included natively in iOS 7. Being able to natively use JavaScript in an app without requiring the use of JavaScript injection on a bloated, slow, security-constrained WebView is very useful for many types of apps, such as games or platforms that support plugins. However, its use is artificially limited because the framework is only supported on iOS. Most developers want to use technologies that will scale across both major mobile operating systems. AndroidJSCore was designed to support that requirement.

For example, you can share Java objects and make async calls:

public interface IAsyncObj {
    public void callMeMaybe(Integer ms, JSValue callback) throws JSException;
}
public class AsyncObj extends JSObject implements IAsyncObj {
    public AsyncObj(JSContext ctx) throws JSException { super(ctx,IAsyncObj.class); }
    @Override
    public void callMeMaybe(Integer ms, JSValue callback) throws JSException {
        new CallMeLater(ms).execute(callback.toObject());
    }

    private class CallMeLater extends AsyncTask<JSObject, Void, JSObject> {
        public CallMeLater(Integer ms) {
            this.ms = ms;
        }
        private final Integer ms;
        @Override
        protected JSObject doInBackground(JSObject... params) {
            try {
                Thread.sleep(ms);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                Thread.interrupted();
        }
            return params[0];
        }

        @Override
        protected void onPostExecute(JSObject callback) {
            JSValue args [] = { new JSValue(context,
                    "This is a delayed message from Java!") };
             try {
                 callback.callAsFunction(null, args);
             } catch (JSException e) {
                 System.out.println(e);
             }
        }
    }
}

public void run() throws JSException {
    AsyncObj async = new AsyncObj(context);
    context.property("async",async);
    context.evaluateScript(
        "log('Please call me back in 5 seconds');\n" +
        "async.callMeMaybe(5000, function(msg) {\n" +
        "    alert(msg);\n" +
        "    log('Whoomp. There it is.');\n" +
        "});\n" +
        "log('async.callMeMaybe() has returned, but wait for it ...');\n"
    );
}
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I just found the App JavaScript for Android, which is the Rhino JavaScript engine for Java. It can use all Java-classes, so it has BIG potential. The problem is it might be slow, since it is not really optimized (heavy CPU load). There is another JavaScript engine named Nashorn, but that unfortunately doesn't works on Google's DalvikVM Java engine (does not support the optimizations of Oracle Java engine). I hope Google keeps up with that, I would just love it!

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