Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sometimes i want to "replace" an object with another object of the same class. Usually i do this in the following way.

The object's class with a constructor:

public class Type {

    private int field;
    private double anotherField;

    public Type(Type anotherTypeInstance) {
        this.field = anotherTypeInstance.getField();
        this.anotherField=anotherTypeInstance.getAnotherField();
    }
}

So whenever i want to replace the object I simply do this

Type oldInstance = new Type(newInstance)

Sometimes it is easy and convenient to do, while others not. Is there an alternative?

EDIT:

I need this kind of "replacement" in optimization algorithms. Where i have to replace the current Solution (object) whith another Solution that has a smaller cost

share|improve this question
    
What you posted doesn't "replace" anything, it does a (form of) copy/clone. Please post a use case where it is "not convenient", or add more detail to what you're trying to achieve. –  Mat Dec 4 '11 at 10:04
1  
There's the Cloneable interface –  artistoex Dec 4 '11 at 10:06
    
Question edited –  user855520 Dec 4 '11 at 10:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can implement Cloneable interface and the clone() method like this

@Override
public Type clone() {
  try {
    return (Type) super.clone();
  } catch (CloneNotSupporedException cnse) {
    throw new RuntimeException(cnse); // Never happens.
  }
}

If you do use clone() for more complex classes, you need to make sure that all mutable objects referred to by fields of the class are recursively cloned as well, i.e. that you make a deep copy instead of a shallow copy. Accidental state sharing that can occur as a result of shallow copy can lead to problems which are hard to debug.

The use of clone() has a number of problems. It circumvents constructors which are normally a place where class's initial invariants are enforced. It is very error prone for classes containing more than just primitive types. Also, the use of clone() is incompatible with non-primitive final fields, since you cannot fix them after cloning an object in case they require modification to ensure deep copying.

Consider for example this class:

public class Car {
  private final Engine engine;

  // ... 

  @Override
  public Car clone() {
    try {
      Type copy = (Type) super.clone();
      copy.engine = (Engine) engine.clone(); // Error: final field cannot be modified.
      return copy;
    } catch (CloneNotSupportedException cnse) {
      throw new RuntimeException(cnse);
    }
  }
}

Copy constructors like the one posted in the question are a much better approach.

share|improve this answer

Yes that is fine. A better way would be:

public class Type {
    private int field;
    private double anotherField;

    @Override
    public Object clone() {
        Type anotherTypeInstance = new Type();
        anotherTypeInstance.field = field;
        anotherTypeInstance.anotherField=anotherField;
        return anotherTypeInstance;
    }
}
// Usage
Type object1 = new Type();
Type object1Cpy = (Type) object1.clone();
share|improve this answer
1  
It is strongly recommended to implement the clone method by first calling super.clone(). Otherwise if a subclass is created (say SubType), it can not reuse the clone method of its parent since the parent class always returns an instance of class Type and not of SubType –  Robin Dec 4 '11 at 10:48

You can use Object.clone() which is a standard way of creating a copy of existing object.

However I can't remember when was the last time I had to use clone(). Why do you need a copy of existing object that has exactly the same fields? Do you want to make changes to object without affecting the "original" one? Consider using immutable objects.

share|improve this answer
    
It's a way of creating a copy of an existing object - yes. But Note that clone() does NOT copy the fields. You'll have to override clone() and handle that yourself. –  halfdan Dec 4 '11 at 10:11
    
Question edited –  user855520 Dec 4 '11 at 10:12
1  
Object.clone() this method performs a "shallow copy" of this object, not a "deep copy" operation. –  GETah Dec 4 '11 at 10:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.