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The following class serve as generic tester for equals/hashCode contract. It is a part of a home grown testing framework.

  • What do you think about?
  • How can I (strong) test this class?
  • It is a good use of Junit theories?

The class:

@Ignore
@RunWith(Theories.class)
public abstract class ObjectTest {

    // For any non-null reference value x, x.equals(x) should return true
    @Theory
    public void equalsIsReflexive(Object x) {
        assumeThat(x, is(not(equalTo(null))));
        assertThat(x.equals(x), is(true));
    }

    // For any non-null reference values x and y, x.equals(y) 
    // should return true if and only if y.equals(x) returns true.
    @Theory
    public void equalsIsSymmetric(Object x, Object y) {
        assumeThat(x, is(not(equalTo(null))));
        assumeThat(y, is(not(equalTo(null))));
        assumeThat(y.equals(x), is(true));
        assertThat(x.equals(y), is(true));
    }

    // For any non-null reference values x, y, and z, if x.equals(y)
    // returns true and y.equals(z) returns true, then x.equals(z) 
    // should return true.
    @Theory
    public void equalsIsTransitive(Object x, Object y, Object z) {
        assumeThat(x, is(not(equalTo(null))));
        assumeThat(y, is(not(equalTo(null))));
        assumeThat(z, is(not(equalTo(null))));
        assumeThat(x.equals(y) && y.equals(z), is(true));
        assertThat(z.equals(x), is(true));
    }

    // For any non-null reference values x and y, multiple invocations
    // of x.equals(y) consistently return true  or consistently return
    // false, provided no information used in equals comparisons on
    // the objects is modified.
    @Theory
    public void equalsIsConsistent(Object x, Object y) {
        assumeThat(x, is(not(equalTo(null))));
        boolean alwaysTheSame = x.equals(y);

        for (int i = 0; i < 30; i++) {
            assertThat(x.equals(y), is(alwaysTheSame));
        }
    }

    // For any non-null reference value x, x.equals(null) should
    // return false.
    @Theory
    public void equalsReturnFalseOnNull(Object x) {
        assumeThat(x, is(not(equalTo(null))));
        assertThat(x.equals(null), is(false));
    }

    // Whenever it is invoked on the same object more than once 
    // the hashCode() method must consistently return the same 
    // integer.
    @Theory
    public void hashCodeIsSelfConsistent(Object x) {
        assumeThat(x, is(not(equalTo(null))));
        int alwaysTheSame = x.hashCode();

        for (int i = 0; i < 30; i++) {
            assertThat(x.hashCode(), is(alwaysTheSame));
        }
    }

    // If two objects are equal according to the equals(Object) method,
    // then calling the hashCode method on each of the two objects
    // must produce the same integer result.
    @Theory
    public void hashCodeIsConsistentWithEquals(Object x, Object y) {
        assumeThat(x, is(not(equalTo(null))));
        assumeThat(x.equals(y), is(true));
        assertThat(x.hashCode(), is(equalTo(y.hashCode())));
    }

    // Test that x.equals(y) where x and y are the same datapoint 
    // instance works. User must provide datapoints that are not equal.
    @Theory
    public void equalsWorks(Object x, Object y) {
        assumeThat(x, is(not(equalTo(null))));
        assumeThat(x == y, is(true));
        assertThat(x.equals(y), is(true));
    }

    // Test that x.equals(y) where x and y are the same datapoint instance
    // works. User must provide datapoints that are not equal.
    @Theory
    public void notEqualsWorks(Object x, Object y) {
        assumeThat(x, is(not(equalTo(null))));
        assumeThat(x != y, is(true));
        assertThat(x.equals(y), is(false));
    }
}

usage:

import org.junit.experimental.theories.DataPoint;

public class ObjectTestTest extends ObjectTest {

    @DataPoint
    public static String a = "a";
    @DataPoint
    public static String b = "b";
    @DataPoint
    public static String nullString = null;
    @DataPoint
    public static String emptyString = "";
}
share|improve this question
    
If I'm reading this correctly, shouldn't the last statement in your equalsIsSymmetric method be assertThat, not assumeThat? –  Bobby Eickhoff May 8 '09 at 2:29
    
Yes, thanks very much :) –  dfa May 8 '09 at 6:59
    
So, you're going for a home grown solution, but do you know of some open source library to do these kinds of common testing? (I also suggest comparable and serializable.) I would be interested in using such a framework. –  ivo May 29 '09 at 23:09
    
there is no such framework (as I can see). I can contribute this code to an open source project (see below in the Frank's answer) –  dfa Jul 24 '09 at 14:09
1  
@ivo: I've integrated this class in dollar: bitbucket.org/dfa/dollar/src/tip/src/test/java/com/humaorie/… –  dfa Jul 1 '10 at 10:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

One thing to consider: testing an object's conformance to the equals contract should involve instances of other types. In particular, problems are likely to appear with instances of a subclass or superclass. Joshua Bloch gives an excellent explanation of the related pitfalls in Effective Java (I'm reusing duffymo's link, so he should get credit for it) -- see the section under Transitivity involving the Point and ColorPoint classes.

True, your implementation doesn't prevent someone from writing a test that involves instances of a subclass, but because ObjectTest is a generic class it gives the impression that all data points should come from a single class (the class being tested). It might be better to remove the type parameter altogether. Just food for thought.

share|improve this answer
    
indeed! Thanks, I'm removing the type parameter T. –  dfa May 8 '09 at 6:58

Joshua Bloch lays out the contract for hash code and equals in chapter 3 of "Effective Java". Looks like you covered a great deal of it. Check the document to see if I missed anything.

share|improve this answer
1  
also the javadoc for Object is very detailed –  dfa May 8 '09 at 0:00

Maybe I'm missing something, but the equalsIsSymmetric test is in fact only correctly tested if you have to DataPoints which have the same values (e.g. String a = "a"; String a2 = "a";) Otherwise this test is only done when the 2 parameters are one instance (i.e. equalsIsSymmetric(a, a);). In fact you test again if equals obey the 'reflective' requirement instead of the symmetric requirement.

share|improve this answer
    
for this reason the test has assumeThat(y.equals(x), is(true)) –  dfa Jul 1 '10 at 10:33
    
yes, but in the current setup it is not able to create an 'x' and a 'y' for which holds x != y and x.equals(y), because the notEqualsWorks test will fail in that case. So the equalsIsSymmetric test is only performed for x and y where x == y. –  Martin Sturm Jul 8 '10 at 13:49
    
yeah. Assuming the above setup, JUnit will execute: equalsIsSymmetric(a, a) and equalsIsSymmetric(b, b). Right? –  dfa Aug 23 '10 at 9:35

The notEqualsWorks(Object x, Object y) theory is false: two distinct instances may still be logically equal according to their equals method; you're assuming instances are logically different if they're different references.

Using your own example above, the two distinct datapoints below (a != a2) are nevertheless equal but fail the notEqualsWorks test:

@DataPoint
public static String a = "a";
@DataPoint
public static String a2 = new String("a");
share|improve this answer
    
true but you should note that the theory has the following requirement: "User must provide datapoints that are not equal". –  dfa Aug 23 '10 at 9:32

The equalsWorks(Object x, Object y) method is doing the very same test as equalsIsReflexive(Object x). It should be removed.

I also think that notEqualsWorks(Object x, Object y) should be removed since it prevents one to do the other theories with data points that are equal even thought the whole testing is about having such objects.

Without such data points the reflexivity is the only thing that is tested.

share|improve this answer

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