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I'm a bit familiar with python's re module but I don't know much about sed. can anyone help me transforming the following python regex statement to the one that is usable for sed?

re.sub(r'main\s*\(([a-zA-Z_0-9\s\,\*\[\]]*)\)([a-zA-Z_0-9\s\,\*\[\]]*){' 
, r'main (\1) \2 { \n signal(SIGSEGV|SIGILL,leave);', string_buffer)

It eventually adds signal handlers right after main function.

$ diff t.c.before t.c.after
1795c1795,1796
< int main (int argc, char** argv) {
---
> int main (int argc, char** argv)   { 
>  signal(SIGSEGV|SIGILL,leave);
1812a1814
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Looking at the regexp you can re-use it 1:1 if I see it right. –  favoretti Dec 4 '11 at 12:45

3 Answers 3

This might work for you:

 echo 'int main (int argc, char** argv) {' |
 sed '/\<main\>.*(.*).*{.*$/a\ signal(SIGSEGV|SIGILL,leave);'
 int main (int argc, char** argv) {
  signal(SIGSEGV|SIGILL,leave);

Explanation:

The regex can be shortened knowing that the .*(.*).*{.*$ will gobble everything up because the .* is greedy. the a\ will append the remaining text retaining spacing.

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Python main\s*\(([a-zA-Z_0-9\s\,\*\[\]]*)\)([a-zA-Z_0-9\s\,\*\[\]]*){ regex is nearly something like that in awk:

/main \([a-zA-Z_0-9 \,\*\[\]]*\)[a-zA-Z_0-9 \,\*\[\]]*\{/

For example:

$> cat ./text
int main (int argc, char** argv) {
   doSomething();
   return 0;
}

$> awk '{print} /main \([a-zA-Z_0-9 \,\*\[\]]*\)[a-zA-Z_0-9 \,\*\[\]]*\{/ {print " signal(SIGSEGV|SIGILL,leave);"}' ./text
int main (int argc, char** argv) {
 signal(SIGSEGV|SIGILL,leave);
   doSomething();
   return 0;
}

What we doing here is printing every line and when some line is matching your regex we are printing string after it.

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Since you can just use the sed append command, you can probably start with a much simpler search expression such as with the following transcript:

pax$ echo '
int main (int argc, char** argv) {
   doSomething();
   return 0;
}' | sed '/main *(/asignal(SIGSEGV|SIGILL,leave);'

int main (int argc, char** argv) {
signal(SIGSEGV|SIGILL,leave);
   doSomething();
   return 0;
}

This will add the line following any line that has main followed by an ( open-parenthesis with any spaces inbetween those two.

That may not necessarily catch every occurrence of main but it should be good enough for the vast majority of cases which are usually exactly as you described although it may also have char *argv[].

For example, if your environment has weird programming standards that (for example) require formal parameters or the opening brace to be on separate lines, it won't work as is.

It may also catch false positives (such as a valid main definition in a commment) but that's a problem with most regex solutions to parsing problems. If that is the case, you can increase the complexity of your search object, after checking it using the diff method you're using.

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