Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was just writing a quick program for calculating some things when I came across the return statement/exit statement for the C program.

I declared main() to be of type int, so I would have to put in a return of an integer, or my program would not compile correctly. However, is it acceptable to make main a Boolean or even void?

I know the standard way to create a C program is to return a value so any problems can be sorted out, among other things, but wouldn't a Boolean work the same way? Also, could I get away with declaring it void and not having problems with the operating system still running my program after it has been terminated?

Thanks for any and all help.

share|improve this question
    
Not necessary, but required. –  Philip Dec 5 '11 at 9:40

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The C99 standard says: (§5.1.2.2.1 Program startup)

The function called at program startup is named main. The implementation declares no prototype for this function. It shall be defined with a return type of int and with no parameters:

int main(void) { /* ... */ }

or with two parameters (referred to here as argc and argv, though any names may be used, as they are local to the function in which they are declared):

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { /* ... */ }

or equivalent; or in some other implementation-defined manner.

So in a hosted environment, int is the only valid, standard return type. Implementations can define other entry points though.

Note that section §5.1.2.2.3 Program Termination has this:

If the return type of the main function is a type compatible with int, a return from the initial call to the main function is equivalent to calling the exit function with the value returned by the main function as its argument; reaching the } that terminates the main function returns a value of 0. If the return type is not compatible with int, the termination status returned to the host environment is unspecified.

So you omitting a return from main is legal in C99, as long as your main returns an int.
(But previous versions of the C standard didn't have that exception for main - returning no value (or reaching the final } without a return statement) causes "the termination status returned to the host environment [to be] undefined.".)

share|improve this answer
    
or in some other implementation-defined manner --> this leaves much room for interpretation :-) –  jdehaan Dec 4 '11 at 15:52
    
@jdehaan: Not really; "implementation-defined" means something that's explicitly documented by the implementation. –  Keith Thompson Dec 4 '11 at 16:09
1  
It's worth mentioning that in C90, reaching the } returns an undefined status. –  Keith Thompson Dec 4 '11 at 16:09

Here is a link that might be of interest. Seems the answer to your question is not that straight. I've also seen compilers (MS Visual C) accepting void as a return type.

share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting indeed! –  nmagerko Dec 4 '11 at 15:51
1  
There is a difference between "hosted" and "freestanding" implementations. The OP should be considered a hosted implementation, and so he should stick to the standard. Borland, Microsoft and Herb Schildt may pollute the language with their own semantics, but they should not name it "standard". –  wildplasser Dec 4 '11 at 15:58

Summary: You don't necessarily have to, but you should.

In C90, reaching the end of main() without executing a return statement "the termination status returned to the host environment is undefined". On at least one system I've used, the status returned is 1, which on that system indicate that the program failed.

C99 added a new rule, saying that reaching the end of main() returns 0. (C++ has the same rule.) Not all compilers fully implement C99, and those that do often don't behave as conforming C99 compilers by default.

The only portable values you can return from main() are 0, EXIT_SUCCESS, and EXIT_FAILURE (the latter two are defined in <stdlib.h>. 0 and EXIT_SUCCESS indicate that the program succeeded (and EXIT_SUCCESS is usually defined as 0); EXIT_FAILURE indicates that the program failed. return 1; is common, but non-portable; I've worked on a system (VMS), where a termination status of 1 indicates success. If you want your program to be portable, Use EXIT_FAILURE to indicate failure; that's what it's for. Some systems and program define other system-specific or application-specific status codes.

For portability (and, IMHO, style), it's best to do an explicit return 0; at the end of main(), though it's not required in all circumstances. It's much easier to add that one line of code (which is, at worst, harmless) than to waste time determining whether you need it.

Note that the correct definitions for main() are:

int main(void) { /* ... */ }

and

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { /* ... */ }

or equivalent (for example, you can write char **argv rather than char *argv[]). It's questionable whether int main() { /* ... */ } is valid, for subtle reasons I won't go into here. Again, it's easier to add the void keyword than to waste time determining whether you need it.

A lot of books and tutorials use void main() or void main(void). A particular compiler may choose to permit this, but it's not portable. Seeing void main in a book or tutorial is a good sign that the author doesn't know the C standard very well, and that you should find something else to study.

share|improve this answer

The code that calls main() expects it to return int (or call exit()). You cannot change the code that calls main() (it is part of the OS or runtime), so you'd better return int.

share|improve this answer

The standard, per ISO, is to return an int. See section 5.1.2.2.1 of this document: http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/n1256.pdf. Also interesting is Stroustrup's commentary on this matter related to both C and C++: http://www2.research.att.com/~bs/bs_faq2.html#void-main.

share|improve this answer

The return type must be int, as covered by other answers. However your assumption that you must return a value at all because of this is wrong, main is an exception. The C99 standard provides for this, so it is perfectly fine to implement main without using return.

share|improve this answer

In ANSI C, main () usually has a return type of int, but it can actually be implementation-defined; this means that different compilers and platforms accept different signatures, but int main () and int main (int, char**) are guaranteed by the standard to be well-formed.

It is unlike other non-void functions, in that it doesn't need a return statement. In the case that none is supplied, and the return type is specified as int, then the program is compiled as if there were an implicit return 0; after the last statement in main ().

The relevant part of the standard:

5.1.2.2.3 Program termination

1 If the return type of the main function is a type compatible with int, a return from the initial call to the main function is equivalent to calling the exit function with the value returned by the main function as its argument; reaching the } that terminates the main function returns a value of 0. If the return type is not compatible with int, the termination status returned to the host environment is unspecified.

Don't quote me on this, but in K+R, however, things were a little looser, and I think you didn't even need to specify a return type, so main () { } is actually a valid K+R program.

share|improve this answer
    
int main(void), not int main(). And in K&R C (and in 1989 ANSI C / 1990 ISO C), if you omit the return type it defaults to int. That rule was dropped in the 1999 ISO C standard. It's never a good idea to take advantage of it. –  Keith Thompson Dec 4 '11 at 16:08
    
Right, of course. I think my C++ is showing... –  Halfbin Dec 4 '11 at 16:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.