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EDIT

To make this post a bit more constructive, and let it possibly help others in the future:

The problem was this:

std::map<Point2, Prop*> mm;
std::pair<Point2, Prop*> p;

if(Keydown(VK_LBUTTON)) {
     p.first = pos; p.second = new Prop();
     mm.insert(p))
}

So even though the map would get iterated over and deallocate all the Prop* pointers in the end, there were times where the insertion would fail (because a pair with the same key might already be in the tree). That means the new Prop() created, would get orphaned.

Solutions:

1) either always use std::shared_ptr (probably best solution)

2) or do this:

std::map<Point2, Prop*> mm;
std::pair<Point2, Prop*> p;

if(Keydown(VK_LBUTTON)) {
     p.first = pos; p.second = new Prop();
     if(mm.insert(p).second == false) {
          delete p.second;
     }
}

Thanks to SO user parapura rajkumar


Original Question:

I'm having memory leaks in my application and I don't know what's causing them! I thought I am deallocating everything I have to. The weird part is: I don't have memory leaks every time I'm running my application.

In short, this is what my app does:

On initialisation, it creates numRows times numColumns new Tile() inside a TileList. When the mouse is hovering over some position on the screen, and the left mouse button is held, it adds a std::pair<Point2, Prop*> p , with p.second = new Prop() to an std::map.

Sometimes I can just add a whole bunch of props and exit the app without any leaks. Sometimes I would add the same props as before, and it will have memory leaks upon exit.

Please help. Here is the relevant code:

If you need to see a specific part of my code, just comment it, and I'll edit the question

PropList.h

class PropList
{
protected:
    std::map<Point2, Prop*> m_Props_m;

public:
    PropList(){}
    virtual ~PropList();

    bool PropAdd(std::pair<Point2, Prop*> p)
    {
        pair<map<Point2, Prop*>::iterator,bool> ret = m_Props_m.insert(p);
        return ret.second;
    }
    bool PropRemove( const Point2& pos );
    bool HasProp( const Point2& pos );

    void Tick();

protected:

};

static void PropRelease(const std::pair<Point2, Prop*>& p) {
    delete p.second;
}

PropList.cpp

PropList::~PropList()
{
    std::for_each(m_Props_m.begin(), m_Props_m.end(), &PropRelease);
}

bool PropList::PropRemove( const Point2& pos )
{
    std::map<Point2, Prop*>::iterator it = m_Props_m.find(pos);
    if (it == m_Props_m.end()) {
        return false;
    }
    delete (*it).second;
    m_Props_m.erase(it);
    return true;
}

TileList.h

class TileList
{
protected:
    std::vector<std::vector<Tile*> > m_Tiles_v;
    PropList m_PropList;

    UINT m_iRowNum;
    UINT m_iColNum;

public:
    TileList(UINT numColumns, UINT numRows);
    virtual ~TileList();

    //Props
    void PropAdd(std::pair<Point2, Prop*> p);
    void PropRemove(const Point2& pos);
    bool HasProp(const Point2& pos);
    void Tick();

    UINT GetNumRows(){return m_iRowNum;}
    UINT GetNumCols(){return m_iColNum;}

protected:
};

TileList.cpp

TileList::TileList(UINT numColumns, UINT numRows)
    :m_iRowNum(numRows)
    ,m_iColNum(numColumns)
{
    for (UINT i = 0; i < numRows; ++i) {
        m_Tiles_v.push_back(std::vector<Tile*>());
        for (UINT j = 0; j < numColumns; ++j) {
            m_Tiles_v[i].push_back(new Tile());
        }
    }
}

TileList::~TileList()
{
    BOOST_FOREACH(std::vector<Tile*> col_tiles_v, m_Tiles_v)
    {
        BOOST_FOREACH(Tile* pTile, col_tiles_v)
        {
            delete pTile;
        }
    }
}

void TileList::PropAdd(std::pair<Point2, Prop*> p)
{
    if(m_PropList.PropAdd(p)) {
        m_Tiles_v[p.first.y][p.first.x]->setOccupied(true);
    }
}

void TileList::PropRemove(const Point2& pos) 
{
    if(m_PropList.PropRemove(pos)) {
        m_Tiles_v[pos.y][pos.x]->setOccupied(false);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried using valgrind or another C/C++ memory profiler on your code? If so, what did it tell you? –  kittylyst Dec 4 '11 at 16:25
2  
As soon as you start finding memory problems, you should use a memory profiler such as Valgrind. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 4 '11 at 16:31
    
Well, I've added this to my code: #if defined(DEBUG) | defined(_DEBUG) _CrtSetDbgFlag( _CRTDBG_ALLOC_MEM_DF | _CRTDBG_LEAK_CHECK_DF ); //_crtBreakAlloc= 44685; #endif And it taught me that it's the 'Prop' resources. Still, I don't know what's wrong –  xcrypt Dec 4 '11 at 16:31
    
I don't see any 'new Prop's, yet you delete them in at least two places. It's all about matching up the news and deletes. –  AShelly Dec 4 '11 at 16:49
    
@Ashelly That's actually my mistake, I didn't add that part to the code, it's in the short explanation. –  xcrypt Dec 4 '11 at 16:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you problem may lie here

 bool PropAdd(std::pair<Point2, Prop*> p)
    {
        pair<map<Point2, Prop*>::iterator,bool> ret = m_Props_m.insert(p);
        return ret.second;
    }

It seems like in your code the mProps has ownership of Prop*. But if a duplicate prop is added to it will be leak because only Prop can exist for a unique Point2 and the map::insert will fail and Prop will be orphaned.

Whenever you insert pointers to object in a map or stl container. Try changing it to std::shared_ptr for automatic memory management. In your case if you do that both your destructors don't have to a do explicit clean up and you don't need static PropRelease at all

share|improve this answer
1  
When you insert into an std::map, the insertion will fail if a key with the same value is already in the map, so that's probably not the problem –  xcrypt Dec 4 '11 at 16:38
1  
@xcrypt But the OP is allocating a new Prop and called PropAdd and assuming the propety will be deleted by the map. The insertion will fail and the Prop will be orphaned –  parapura rajkumar Dec 4 '11 at 16:43
    
Right! you're a genius! Let me try fix that :) –  xcrypt Dec 4 '11 at 16:45
2  
The best fix would be to use shared_ptr. How about at least an upvote :) –  parapura rajkumar Dec 4 '11 at 16:45
    
I know, but I am deliberately avoiding ptr-helpers at this moment, to get my hands dirty and get more exp with memory management. But yeah, you're correct. –  xcrypt Dec 4 '11 at 16:52

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