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Normal way to make a new object:

std::string date1 = "10/1/2010"; Date d1(stringToChar(date1);

But I can't figure out how to use that in a struct. The struct:

struct RecPayments
{
    std::string name;
    Date datemake();
    float cost;
};

Trying to use it like this:

void addRecurring()
{
    //New recurring payment
    RecPayments * newPaymentItem = new RecPayments;

    //Set recurring payment properties
    newPaymentItem->name = "Test Payment";
    newPaymentItem->datemake(stringToChar("4/12/2011"));
    newPaymentItem->cost = 5;
}

Error received:

error: no matching function for call to ‘RecPayments::datemake(const char*)

What's the proper way to do this?

share|improve this question
1  
C and C++ are not the same thing. – R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 4 '11 at 17:53
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes the Date class I am using is writtin in C so since I'm mixing both C and C++ I thought it would be appropriate to add both as a tag.. – natli Dec 4 '11 at 18:00
    
@natili, no the class is not a C struct, since its members contain non-trivial constructors, and a function. – Mooing Duck Dec 4 '11 at 18:07
    
Hmm.. the more pointers you create on heap the more headache you have later to manage them. – Beginner Dec 4 '11 at 18:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The braces () in your Date datemake(); are confusing the compiler.

Just remove them.

If you want to explicitly create the Date object inside addRecurring() with non default c'tor then make it a pointer and create it..

struct RecPayments
{
    std::string name;
    Date* date;
    float cost;
};

void addRecurring()
{
    //New recurring payment
    RecPayments * newPaymentItem = new RecPayments;

    //Set recurring payment properties
    newPaymentItem->name = "Test Payment";
    newPaymentItem->date = new Date(stringToChar("4/12/2011"));
    newPaymentItem->cost = 5;
}

obviously as you use new, you'll now need delete somewhere as well.. or use smart pointers..

share|improve this answer
    
That's not an answer to the question, though. – Oliver Charlesworth Dec 4 '11 at 17:57
    
Agreed.. updated.. – Kashyap Dec 4 '11 at 18:02
    
This seems to work just fine, thank you. – natli Dec 4 '11 at 18:08

Well, the compiler is right. The way you've used the struct has given you (in effect) a class. You declared a function RecPayments::datemake() but never defined it anywhere. What's more, you didn't even call this version of the function you created--you sent with it an argument that it didn't expect.

You need to remove the () in the datemake variable you've declared, or make a full function out of it. I'm not sure from the question which one you wanted.

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Date datemake();

This is defined as a function that takes no argument. When you call it as

newPaymentItem->datemake(stringToChar("4/12/2011"));

you are passing string from stringToChar() to you function datemake().

What you can do is first make an Date variable in your structure as

Date date;

and then assign it value as

newPaymentItem->date = stringToChar("4/12/2011");
share|improve this answer
    
That works only if there is a copy c'tor / assignment operator available for Date type. – Kashyap Dec 4 '11 at 18:08
    
@thekashayap sir i dont know about the definition of Date class. I just assumed it has a copy constructor. I dont have much knowledge about MFC classes(in case Date is a MFC) – Veer Bahadur Singh Dec 4 '11 at 18:15

This

std::string date1 = "10/1/2010";

is an initialization using an overloaded operator =.

This

Date d1(stringToChar(date1);

is an initialization by a constructor.

In

struct RecPayments
{
    std::string name;
    Date datemake();
    float cost;
};

Date datemake(); is a declaration of a function that returns Date, not a member field of type Date. So you need to remove those braces.

Also

newPaymentItem->datemake(stringToChar("4/12/2011"));

is a function call, but all you really want to do is an assignment. So it should be changed to newPaymentItem->datemake = stringToChar("4/12/2011"); The latter implies that your Date class has an appropriate overloading of operator =. If it was not overloaded, then you might say newPaymentItem->datemake = Date(stringToChar("4/12/2011");) in this case automatically overloaded operator = will be used.

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