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I use numpy.random.normal function in a tough loop in a class.

class MyClass(MyBaseClass):   
    def run(self):
        while True:
            ...
            self.L.append(numpy.random.normal(0,1))

I know that it's pretty slow in Python to use multiple lookups. In numpy.random.normal there are 3 lookups: first numpy is looked up, then random, and then normal.

So I decided to address this problem by assigning numpy.random.normal to a local variable _normal.

Here we go:

class MyClass(MyBaseClass):
    _normal = numpy.random.normal
    def run(self):
        while True:
            ...
            self.L.append(MyClass._normal(0,1))

What I'm really concerned about is descriptors. When a variable in a class in accessed, all the bases classes are looked up for the data descriptor with the same name. It's described here:

Check objectname.__class__.__dict__for attrname. If it exists and is a data-descriptor, return the descriptor result. Search all bases of objectname.__class__ for the same case.

So, I guess, if I put _normal in the local space as I did above, it will case looking up all bases classes for the data descriptor. And I wary of it becoming a source of a slowdown.

Are my concerns justified?

Should I worry about the time it takes to look up for the descriptors in base classes?

And is there a better way to speed up access to a function located deep into a module when it's used in a class?


There was a discussion in the comments to the answers.

I decided to give some additional details of implementation that appeared to be important (for my particular case).

Actually, the code is closer to this (it's very very simplified):

class MyClass(MyBaseClass):

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

    def next(self):
        self.L.append(numpy.random.normal(0,1))   

    def run(self):
        while True:
            self.next()
share|improve this question
    
That article seems fishy, mostly because it has no mention of _getattr__, __getattribute__ and __setattr__ and because it seems to say that class attributes always take precedence over instance attributes (which is clearly not the case). I'd stick to the official documentation. –  delnan Dec 4 '11 at 18:15
    
@delnan In this case I think it's particularly important to lay out all it in the answer. –  ovgolovin Dec 4 '11 at 18:19
    
@delnan: in the case of descriptors, class "attributes" do take precedence over instance attributes. The resolution order is descriptors first, then instance attributes, and finally class attributes. For this reason, it's unusual to even have instance attributes when a descriptor is present, the descriptor will normally prevent the instance attribute from ever being assigned. –  IfLoop Dec 4 '11 at 18:31
    
@TokenMacGuy: Thanks for prompting me to re-check, I missed the "and is a data descriptor" part in step 2. Now it makes slightly more sense. –  delnan Dec 4 '11 at 18:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you must do something like this (is function lookup actually the dominant cost? Random number generation is not cheap) you should realize that one global + one attr lookup (MyClass._normal) is not that much cheaper than one global + three attr lookups (numpy.random.normal). What you really want is to get zero global or attr lookups inside the loop, which you can only do by defining _normal inside the function. If you're really desperate to shave cycles you should also prebind the list append call:

class MyClass(MyBaseClass):
    def run(self):
        _normal = numpy.random.normal
        _Lappend = self.L.append
        while True:
            ...
            _Lappend(_normal(0,1))

Contrast disassembly output (just for the append statement):

  LOAD_FAST                0 (self)
  LOAD_ATTR                1 (L)
  LOAD_ATTR                2 (append)
  LOAD_GLOBAL              3 (numpy)
  LOAD_ATTR                4 (random)
  LOAD_ATTR                5 (normal)
  LOAD_CONST               1 (0)
  LOAD_CONST               2 (1)
  CALL_FUNCTION            2
  CALL_FUNCTION            1
  POP_TOP             

vs

  LOAD_FAST                2 (_Lappend)
  LOAD_FAST                1 (_normal)
  LOAD_CONST               1 (0)
  LOAD_CONST               2 (1)
  CALL_FUNCTION            2
  CALL_FUNCTION            1

What would be even better is to vectorize -- generate many random normal deviates from and append them to the list in one go -- you can do that with the size argument to numpy.random.normal.

share|improve this answer
    
My only concern was that random generator is written in C and it's fast, and all those lookup are made by Python and they are pretty slow. I very well remember the article by Guido Van Rossum where he points out how costly may lookups be. –  ovgolovin Dec 4 '11 at 19:01
    
> one global + three attr lookups: But in this case this global lookup is actually is very costly, because this lookup is looking all the bases for the satisfactory descriptor. –  ovgolovin Dec 4 '11 at 19:06
    
And in my particular case (I didn't reflect it in the question) _normal was located in the other method, called next. There was a run method, but it called next in a tough loop. I thought it was a redundant detail for the question, but it seems to be not. Because if I create a function in next method and locate _normal and _Lappend in it, nothing will change, since it calls _normal only once and putting normal to a local namespace actually has to do one search for normal which can be made directly. –  ovgolovin Dec 4 '11 at 19:10
    
@ovgolovin: (1) The lookups are also written in C (though they operate on Python objects, the random number generator also needs to create a Python object). (2) The global lookup won't look through base classes, only the attribute lookups (all of them) may do so. (3) You're optimizing for performance yet you didn't consider inlining trivial methods? Method calls are even more complicated (attr lookup + bound method object creation + frame setup + possibly extra opcodes + missed peephole optimizations). –  delnan Dec 4 '11 at 19:11
    
@delnan may be it's better to put _normal into global namespace? Or maybe I exaggerating and all those descriptor search procedures are quite fast? Then what about the article by Giudo Van Rossum I mentioned in the first comment? –  ovgolovin Dec 4 '11 at 19:14

And I wary of it becoming a source of a slowdown.

Are my concerns justified?

That depends. Is it already fast enough for the application you have in mind? If so, don't fret. Changes in CPython, PyPy, NumPy and moore's law are likely to mitigate the magnitude of the "slowdown" before it becomes a sticking point.

share|improve this answer
    
But moore's law will positively influence the more effective code as well. In fact, my project where I used this is over. And that was a one-off 1 minute code run. So there is no problem now. But I want to teach myself a good code practice. And this is a good opportunity to learn how to address such problems discussed in the question. –  ovgolovin Dec 4 '11 at 18:39
    
Why I'm actually asking is that they may be some ready checked over time solutions. It may be even better to put _normal to global namespace than to class namespace. So, I'm asking in hope somebody has the answer or suggestions. –  ovgolovin Dec 4 '11 at 18:45
    
PyPy will optimize that away though. Those optimizations are completely pointless in PyPy. –  fijal Dec 6 '11 at 19:54

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