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I'm trying to ask the user to enter numbers thats put into a vector, then using a function call to cout the numbers, why is this not working? I am only able to cout the first number.

template <typename T>
void write_vector(const vector<T>& V)
{
   cout << "The numbers in the vector are: " << endl;
  for(int i=0; i < V.size(); i++)
    cout << V[i] << " ";
}

int main()
{
  int input;
  vector<int> V;
  cout << "Enter your numbers to be evaluated: " << endl;
  cin >> input;
  V.push_back(input);
  write_vector(V);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
You're reading a single number. –  Mat Dec 4 '11 at 18:47
    
How would i read in more. –  Sean Dec 4 '11 at 18:49
    
Search this site for "[c++] read numbers cin". You'll get lots of examples. –  Mat Dec 4 '11 at 18:50
3  
Did you try using an additional variable? Instead of using n for both the size and the temporary input. –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 5 '11 at 0:01
2  
You should explain what's not working here. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 5 '11 at 0:03

10 Answers 10

As is, you're only reading in a single integer and pushing it into your vector. Since you probably want to store several integers, you need a loop. E.g., replace

cin >> input;
V.push_back(input);

with

while (cin >> input)
    V.push_back(input);

What this does is continually pull in ints from cin for as long as there is input to grab; the loop continues until cin finds EOF or tries to input a non-integer value. The alternative is to use a sentinel value, though this prevents you from actually inputting that value. Ex:

while ((cin >> input) && input != 9999)
    V.push_back(input);

will read until you try to input 9999 (or any of the other states that render cin invalid), at which point the loop will terminate.

share|improve this answer
    
operator void* does not return NULL for EOF, so the while (cin >> input) only aborts for invalid input, but not EOF. –  pezcode Dec 4 '11 at 19:11
    
Using an istream in a condition, e.g. while (cin >> input) evaluates the stream (or, more precisely in this case, the reference to the stream returned by operator>>) by checking its state, which is made invalid when the stream tries to read in EOF and therefore is evaluated as false. –  jsinger Dec 4 '11 at 19:21
    
so reading EOF sets badbit or failbit in addition to eofbit? –  pezcode Dec 4 '11 at 20:32
    
Hitting EOF sets both eofbit and failbit. I apparently had some misunderstanding about the evaluation of streams as conditions, though, which your comments have lead me to investigate and clear up, so thanks! –  jsinger Dec 4 '11 at 22:07

You need a loop for that. So do this:

while (cin >> input) //enter any non-integer to end the loop!
{
   V.push_back(input);
}

Or use this idiomatic version:

#include <iterator> //for std::istream_iterator 

std::istream_iterator begin(std::cin), end;
std::vector<int> v(begin, end);
write_vector(v);

You could also improve your write_vector as:

 #include <algorithm> //for std::copy

template <typename T>
void write_vector(const vector<T>& v)
{
   cout << "The numbers in the vector are: " << endl;
   std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Now its stuck in a continuous loop of asking for numbers. –  Sean Dec 4 '11 at 18:55
    
@Sean: No. Enter any non-integer to end the loop! –  Nawaz Dec 4 '11 at 18:56
    
if i ask the user to enter a certain amount of inputs how could i stop it after that many? –  Sean Dec 4 '11 at 19:09
    
@Sean for(int i = 0; i < inputcount; ++i) { // do your stuff here } –  greatwolf Dec 4 '11 at 19:13
    
@Sean: Just ask him to enter ANY non-integer to end to the loop. For example, it could be anthing. A, a, jikhjik, 1.29. It should be non-integer. Why don't you experiment, and see how it works? –  Nawaz Dec 4 '11 at 19:14

cin is delimited on space, so if you try to cin "1 2 3 4 5" into a single integer, your only going to be assigning 1 to the integer, a better option is to wrap your input and push_back in a loop, and have it test for a sentinel value, and on that sentinel value, call your write function. such as

int input;
cout << "Enter your numbers to be evaluated, and 10000 to quit: " << endl;
while(input != 10000) {
    cin >> input;
   V.push_back(input);
}
write_vector(V);
share|improve this answer

Other answers would have you disallow a particular number, or tell the user to enter something non-numeric in order to terminate input. Perhaps a better solution is to use std::getline() to read a line of input, then use std::istringstream to read all of the numbers from that line into the vector.

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <vector>

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    std::string line;
    int number;
    std::vector<int> numbers;

    std::cout << "Enter numbers separated by spaces: ";
    std::getline(std::cin, line);
    std::istringstream stream(line);
    while (stream >> number)
        numbers.push_back(number);

    write_vector(numbers);

}

Also, your write_vector() implementation can be replaced with a more idiomatic call to the std::copy() algorithm to copy the elements to an std::ostream_iterator to std::cout:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

template<class T>
void write_vector(const std::vector<T>& vector) {
    std::cout << "Numbers you entered: ";
    std::copy(vector.begin(), vector.end(),
        std::ostream_iterator<T>(std::cout, " "));
    std::cout << '\n';
}

You can also use std::copy() and a couple of handy iterators to get the values into the vector without an explicit loop:

std::copy(std::istream_iterator<int>(stream),
    std::istream_iterator<int>(),
    std::back_inserter(numbers));

But that’s probably overkill.

share|improve this answer

You need a second integer.

int i,n;
vector<int> V;
cout << "Enter the amount of numbers you want to evaluate: ";
cin >> i;
cout << "Enter your numbers to be evaluated: " << endl;
while (V.size() < i && cin >> n){
  V.push_back(n);
}
write_vector(V);
return 0;
share|improve this answer
    
Works perfect except i would prefer for the program to cin after the ith number instead of i+1. Would i have to use a differrent type of loop for that? –  Sean Dec 5 '11 at 0:07
    
By cin after the ith number instead of i+1, did you mean take one fewer input value than this? while (cin >> n && V.size() < i-1) will do that. If you want to take one more instead of one less, i+1 instead. Don't use the ++ or -- operators here, those will change the value of i. –  01d55 Dec 5 '11 at 0:14
    
i mean by using this say i enter 3 for the amount of numbers to be evaluated. The program wont run until i have entered the fourth number and then it will cout the correct amount being 3. Is there a way to start the program after entering the third number. –  Sean Dec 5 '11 at 0:17
    
while (V.size() < i && cin >> n) –  01d55 Dec 5 '11 at 0:19
1  
No problem. Take a few minutes to look over your questions and accept the answers that you judge most complete - click the check mark outline and it will fill in. –  01d55 Dec 5 '11 at 0:28

You probably want to read in more numbers, not only one. For this, you need a loop

int main()
{
  int input = 0;
  while(input != -1){
    vector<int> V;
    cout << "Enter your numbers to be evaluated: " << endl;
    cin >> input;
    V.push_back(input);
    write_vector(V);
  }
  return 0;
}

Note, with this version, it is not possible to add the number -1 as it is the "end signal". Type numbers as long as you like, it will be aborted when you type -1.

share|improve this answer

In this case your while loop will look like

int i = 0;
int a = 0;
while (i < n){
  cin >> a;
  V.push_back(a);
  ++i;
}
share|improve this answer

The initial size() of V will be 0, while int n contains any random value because you don't initialize it.

V.size() < n is probably false.

Silly me missed the "Enter the amount of numbers you want to evaluate: "

If you enter a n that's smaller than V.size() at that time, the loop will terminate.

share|improve this answer
    
n is initialized with cin >> n. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 5 '11 at 0:03
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes: yeah, update. –  Thom Wiggers Dec 5 '11 at 0:06

Just add another variable.

int temp;
while (cin >> temp && V.size() < n){
    V.push_back(temp);
}
share|improve this answer
    
You forgot to change one n :) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 5 '11 at 0:06
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes: What do you mean? V.size() < n? That's intentional. –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 5 '11 at 0:07
1  
Shouldn't conditions be switched? If n == 0 you will keep waiting. –  Beginner Dec 5 '11 at 0:08
    
I fixed it. You had V.push_back(n). –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 5 '11 at 0:08
    
Why don't you correct your code? –  Beginner Dec 5 '11 at 0:36
#include<iostream>
#include<vector>
#include<sstream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector<string> v;
    string line,t;
    getline(cin,line);
    istringstream iss(line);
    while(iss>>t)
        v.push_back(t);

    vector<string>::iterator it;
    for(it=v.begin();it!=v.end();it++)
        cout<<*it<<endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
please describe what your code does and modify it so it matches the code of the question –  Daniel Ruf Aug 27 '13 at 8:03

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