Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

im total rubbish at maths, and its hurting my head trying to figure this out. Im trying to have two things happen at different speeds. I want to have two speeds, doesnt particularly matter whether the scale is from 1 - 10 or 0.1 - 1. but i want to have them go faster the higher they are. at the moment the way i figured it out, its the other way round. i want it to be based on the clock resolution so if i increase it - then the maths is all still good with it. the global speed setting was just to play with, could get rid of that. can think of ways of reversing this so its the other way round, but i think its going to end up being a huge equation with my head :) theres probably a way of doing this that is 'standard' - any ideas ?

#!/usr/bin/env python

import time

speed1=1
speed2=10
clock_res=500
global_speed=5

def start():  

        for x in range (0,clock_res):
                print x
                if (x%(speed1*global_speed)) == 0:
                        print "speed1"
                if (x%(speed2*global_speed)) == 0:
                        print "speed2"
                time.sleep(.05)

if __name__ == '__main__':

        start()

thanks for any help! edited from suggestions..

#!/usr/bin/env python

import time

speed1=0.7
speed2=0.3
clock_res=500

def start():  

        for x in range (0,clock_res):
                print x
                if (x%(speed1*clock_res)) == 0:
                        print "speed1"
                if (x%(speed2*clock_res)) == 0:
                        print "speed2"
                time.sleep(.05)

if __name__ == '__main__':

        start()

that better ?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you want "speed" to be equivalent to frequency, you can't use it as a period, which is the inverse of frequency. Do something like:

speed1 = .3    # must be between 0 and 1
speed2 = .7

time1 += speed1
if time1 >= 1.:
    time1 -= 1.
    print "speed1"
share|improve this answer
    
/me scratches head. thanks! ok lemme try that. what do you mean when you say 'as a period' - bearing in mind im a luddite... ok im guessing thats the opposite of frequency ? its sitting funny in my head. –  user1064306 Dec 4 '11 at 22:23
    
after tapping stuff into the calculator, of course you are right. i didnt know it is called frequency if its between 0 and 1. thanks a lot. –  user1064306 Dec 5 '11 at 1:27
    
This is beyond the problem at hand, but analog frequencies are what you are thinking of. Digital frequencies are normlized by the sample rate - in your case time.sleep(.05) means run through the loop at 20 samples per second, and digital frequencies of 0.0 to 1.0 correspond to analog frequencies of 0 to 20 Hz. The fastest sine wave you could represent accurately is .5, half the sample rate, or 10 Hz. –  Dave Dec 5 '11 at 12:37
    
really ? it runs at 20hz ? not 44.1 ? :) i wasnt trying to be accurate doing that, just trying to slow it down a bit so you can see whats going on. –  user1064306 Dec 5 '11 at 13:53
    
If you did time.sleep(.5), it would wait for half a second each time through the loop. So it would do the loop 2 times each second. 1/frequency = time. –  Dave Dec 5 '11 at 14:08

At the moment, you seem to be counting up, so, consider this.

Ignore global_speed for the minute, and just have two speeds, s1 and s2. Given you are effectively saying "when x is a multiple of s1 or s2, output "speed1" or "speed2" respectively, a lower value will mean that x is a multiple of that value faster.

So, there's a couple of ways you can get around this. You can either just accept that a lower value is faster, or subtract the current speed from the max speed (which will have to be pre-determined, or the max of s1 and s2).

share|improve this answer
    
hey dude, thanks for the help. it would be much nicer if its faster, cos you kind of naturally think of higher as faster usually. –  user1064306 Dec 4 '11 at 22:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.