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I've created a fairly simple new method in one of my models. However, when I go to the rails console to test it, I get the following error:

NoMethodError: undefined method 'get' for #<Class:0x3a5032fc>

I have saved the code, closed the rails console and then restarted, but I still get the NoMethod

class Race <ActiveRecord::Base
  def get(race_date,track_name,race_number)
    Race.where(:date =>race_date, :race_nbr => race_number, :track_id => (Track.where(:track_code => track_name)))
  end
end

In the console, I enter the following:

Race.get("2011-12-04", "BEL", 1)

which yields the NoMethodError:undefined method 'get'.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You defined an instance method of the class Race. Maybe you would have defined a class method like:

def self.get(race_date, track_name, race_number)
    track = Track.where(:track_code => track_name)
    Race.where(:date => race_date, :race_nbr => race_number, :track_id => track)
end

Then you can use Race.get.

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1  
nice answer, +1 –  apneadiving Dec 4 '11 at 23:47
2  
I would separate out the track into a local variable, just to make the line shorter. But besides that, great answer. –  Ryan Bigg Dec 5 '11 at 1:01
    
Ryan - What exactly do you mean by separating track into a local variable. Could you give me an example of what you mean. –  Mutuelinvestor Dec 5 '11 at 1:20
1  
@Mutuelinvestor Look at the updated answer again. just set track = Track.where(:track_code => track_name) and then pass that in to the where statement in the Race query so it's cleaner code. –  iWasRobbed Dec 5 '11 at 1:55
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@lucapette got it right; you need to create a class method. Below is another way that you can define class methods. In large projects where you're defining a large number of class methods, it can be a cleaner way of organizing code, but that opinion is purely subjective.

class << self
  def get(race_date,track_name,race_number)
    Race.where(:date => race_date, 
               :race_nbr => race_number, 
               :track_id => (Track.where(:track_code => track_name)))
  end
end

Everything defined within class << self becomes a class method.

Another option is to use a scope.

scope :get, 
      lambda { |race_date, track_name, race_number| 
               Race.where(:date => race_date, 
                          :race_nbr => race_number, 
                          :track_id => (Track.where(:track_code => track_name))) }

This last solution looks a little unwieldy as a scope, so it's probably best to use a class method in this case instead of a scope. Also, I prefer scopes that have descriptive names, but I guess that would apply to method names as well.

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nice add-on, +1 –  apneadiving Dec 4 '11 at 23:48
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After two great answers, I feel like something else should be stated:

If your console was already launched, it won't guess you've added some code so you have to reload.

Yo do this, simply type:

reload!

in the console (=no need to CTRL-C).

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That's a great point. If you're editing outside of the console, this is a must. I don't know how I missed that. +1 –  Sean Hill Dec 4 '11 at 23:48
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