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I have a Ruby hash which looks like:

{ "id" => "123", "name" => "test" }

I would like to convert it to:

{ :id => "123", :name => "test" }
share|improve this question
    
dup? –  Ian Vaughan May 11 '12 at 14:39
1  
@IanVaughan Recursion! –  Doorknob May 12 '13 at 0:06

10 Answers 10

up vote 28 down vote accepted
hash = {"apple" => "banana", "coconut" => "domino"}
Hash[hash.map{ |k, v| [k.to_sym, v] }]
#=> {:apple=>"banana", :coconut=>"domino"}

Update:

@mu is too short: Didn't see word "recursive", but if you insist (along with protection against non-existent to_sym, just want to remind that in Ruby 1.8 1.to_sym == nil, so playing with some key types can be misleading):

hash = {"a" => {"b" => "c"}, "d" => "e", Object.new => "g"}

s2s = 
  lambda do |h| 
    Hash === h ? 
      Hash[
        h.map do |k, v| 
          [k.respond_to?(:to_sym) ? k.to_sym : k, s2s[v]] 
        end 
      ] : h 
  end

s2s[hash] #=> {:d=>"e", #<Object:0x100396ee8>=>"g", :a=>{:b=>"c"}}
share|improve this answer
    
I like this version as long as the keys understand to_sym. You might get asked for a recursive version though. –  mu is too short Dec 5 '11 at 7:05
    
this doesn't work if you have a hash within an array: {"a"=>{"b"=>"c"}, "d"=>[{"f"=>"e"}]} see the last element "d". I am going to try to figure this out, but help/answers are welcome. I can understand this may not work for other objects, but I think arrays like this are common? –  nilanjan May 1 '13 at 2:17
    
@nilanjan seems to me that it shouldn't in this context; if that functionality were required I would argue a second method should be created, as you would essentially be treating that nested array as if it were partially flattened. –  Chris Feb 7 at 22:57

If you happen to be in Rails then you'll have symbolize_keys:

Return a new hash with all keys converted to symbols, as long as they respond to to_sym.

and symbolize_keys! which does the same but operates in-place. So, if you're in Rails, you could:

hash.symbolize_keys!

If you want to recursively symbolize inner hashes then I think you'd have to do it yourself but with something like this:

def symbolize_keys_deep!(h)
    h.keys.each do |k|
        ks    = k.to_sym
        h[ks] = h.delete k
        symbolize_keys_deep! h[ks] if h[ks].kind_of? Hash
    end
end

You might want to play with the kind_of? Hash to match your specific circumstances; using respond_to? :keys might make more sense. And if you want to allow for keys that don't understand to_sym, then:

def symbolize_keys_deep!(h)
    h.keys.each do |k|
        ks    = k.respond_to?(:to_sym) ? k.to_sym : k
        h[ks] = h.delete k # Preserve order even when k == ks
        symbolize_keys_deep! h[ks] if h[ks].kind_of? Hash
    end
end

Note that h[ks] = h.delete k doesn't change the content of the Hash when k == ks but it will preserve the order when you're using Ruby 1.9+. You could also use the [(key.to_sym rescue key) || key] approach that Rails uses in their symbolize_keys! but I think that's an abuse of the exception handling system.

The second symbolize_keys_deep! turns this:

{ 'a' => 'b', 'c' => { 'd' => { 'e' => 'f' }, 'g' => 'h' }, ['i'] => 'j' }

into this:

{ :a => 'b', :c => { :d => { :e => 'f' }, :g => 'h' }, ['i'] => 'j' }

You could monkey patch either version of symbolize_keys_deep! into Hash if you really wanted to but I generally stay away from monkey patching unless I have very good reasons to do it.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Also if @ed1t doesn't user Rails, it's easy to see hot it's implemented there –  MBO Dec 5 '11 at 0:09
    
is there an option to call symbolize_keys recursively? –  ed1t Dec 5 '11 at 1:02
    
@ed1t: I think you'd have to do the recursive version by hand but it isn't terribly difficult, please see my update. –  mu is too short Dec 5 '11 at 1:22

Try this:

hash = {"apple" => "banana", "coconut" => "domino"}
 # => {"apple"=>"banana", "coconut"=>"domino"} 

hash.tap do |h|
  h.keys.each { |k| h[k.to_sym] = h.delete(k) }
end
 # => {:apple=>"banana", :coconut=>"domino"} 

This iterates over the keys, and for each one, it deletes the stringified key and assigns its value to the symbolized key.

share|improve this answer
    
I also have arrays and hash inside of the object. How can I apply this recursilvely? –  ed1t Dec 5 '11 at 0:10
1  
I like this answer but I don't understand the purpose of tap –  pguardiario Dec 5 '11 at 0:48
1  
They both produce the same end result. However, if we didn't use #tap, then the value of the expression would be the list of modified keys (h.keys), which is somewhat confusing. I used #tap so that the result is the hash rather than the array of keys. It's just for illustrative purposes. –  John Feminella Dec 5 '11 at 13:19

Victor Moroz provided a lovely answer for the simple recursive case, but it won't process hashes that are nested within nested arrays:

hash = { "a" => [{ "b" => "c" }] }
s2s[hash] #=> {:a=>[{"b"=>"c"}]}

If you need to support hashes within arrays within hashes, you'll want something more like this:

def recursive_symbolize_keys(h)
  case h
  when Hash
    Hash[
      h.map do |k, v|
        [ k.respond_to?(:to_sym) ? k.to_sym : k, recursive_symbolize_keys(v) ]
      end
    ]
  when Enumerable
    h.map { |v| recursive_symbolize_keys(v) }
  else
    h
  end
end
share|improve this answer

I'm partial to:

irb
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :001 > hash = {"apple" => "banana", "coconut" => "domino"}
{
      "apple" => "banana",
    "coconut" => "domino"
}
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :002 > hash.inject({}){ |h, (n,v)| h[n.to_sym] = v; h }
{
      :apple => "banana",
    :coconut => "domino"
}

This works because we're iterating over the hash and building a new one on the fly. It isn't recursive, but you could figure that out from looking at some of the other answers.

hash.inject({}){ |h, (n,v)| h[n.to_sym] = v; h }
share|improve this answer
3  
each_with_object would probably be a better call than inject in this case (unless of course each_with_object wasn't available). –  mu is too short Dec 5 '11 at 19:05
    
@muistooshort, well, it's almost a wash between the two. I prefer inject, just because I always use it. From looking at the source of the two, inject is bigger, but that doesn't necessarily mean slower, or slow enough to make a real difference. The reversed parameters and lack of a need to return the h value will cause a pause in my thinking to use it, so is there some compelling reason to use each_with_object? Maybe some benchmark somewhere showing inject getting smoked? –  the Tin Man Dec 6 '11 at 17:32
    
I tend to use inject when I'm interested in the block's return value (a.inject(:+) and such) and each_with_object when I'd have to add the ; h bit to the block or when I'm interesting in "iteration with some baggage" rather than simple injection. The block argument order difference between them is a little perverse. I find that the block return value gets visually lost over in the right side. Or maybe I'm just opinionated :) –  mu is too short Dec 6 '11 at 17:53
    
No, you're not opinionated, I think reversing the parameters was a bad design choice but we're stuck with it now. –  the Tin Man Dec 6 '11 at 19:27

If you're using Rails (or just activesupport):

{ "id" => "123", "name" => "test" }.symbolize_keys
share|improve this answer
1  
Or the recursive version, deep_symbolize_keys –  pje Sep 30 '13 at 15:40
    
symbolize_keys is not recursive. –  pisaruk Nov 28 '13 at 17:26
    
The original question does not require recursion. –  bonkydog Nov 29 '13 at 1:46

Just in case you are parsing JSON, from the json docs you can add the option to symbolize the keys upon parsing:

hash = JSON.parse(json_data, symbolize_names: true)
share|improve this answer
def symbolize_keys(hash)
   new={}
   hash.map do |key,value|
        if value.is_a?(Hash)
          value = symbolize_keys(value) 
        end
        new[key.to_sym]=value
   end        
   return new

end  
puts symbolize_keys("c"=>{"a"=>2,"k"=>{"e"=>9}})
#{:c=>{:a=>2, :k=>{:e=>9}}}
share|improve this answer

Here's my two cents,

my version of symbolize_keys_deep! uses the original symbolize_keys! provided by rails and just makes a simple recursive call to Symbolize sub hashes.

  def symbolize_keys_deep!(h)
    h.symbolize_keys!
    h.each do |k, v|
      symbolize_keys_deep!(v) if v.is_a? Hash
    end
  end
share|improve this answer

You can also extend core Hash ruby class placing a /lib/hash.rb file :

class Hash
  def symbolize_keys_deep!
    new_hash = {}
    keys.each do |k|
      ks    = k.respond_to?(:to_sym) ? k.to_sym : k
      if values_at(k).first.kind_of? Hash or values_at(k).first.kind_of? Array
        new_hash[ks] = values_at(k).first.send(:symbolize_keys_deep!)
      else
        new_hash[ks] = values_at(k).first
      end
    end

    new_hash
  end
end

If you want to make sure keys of any hash wrapped into arrays inside your parent hash are symbolized, you need to extend also array class creating a "array.rb" file with that code :

class Array
  def symbolize_keys_deep!
    new_ar = []
    self.each do |value|
      new_value = value
      if value.is_a? Hash or value.is_a? Array
        new_value = value.symbolize_keys_deep!
      end
      new_ar << new_value
    end
    new_ar
  end
end

This allows to call "symbolize_keys_deep!" on any hash variable like this :

myhash.symbolize_keys_deep!
share|improve this answer
    
It allows as well to call "symbolize_keys_deep!" on arrays as well ! –  David Fabreguette Jul 9 at 8:10

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