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I want to initialize a hashtable inside my class only once for my web application.

How can you do this in a thread-safe manner in case?

public class MySettings {

   private HashTable<int, SomeObject> settings;

}

Should it be marked static or final or volatile? Do I wrap it in a synchronize?

Also, how can I set the properties of SomeObject inline? Is it possible in java?

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You're got an illegal declaration there: You can't specify int as a generic type. Try Integer –  Bohemian Dec 5 '11 at 0:09
    
"Also, how can I set the properties of SomeObject inline? Is it possible in java?" - totally orthogonal to your real question. Ask it in a different Question ... and take the time to expand on what you are really asking ... –  Stephen C Dec 5 '11 at 1:14

2 Answers 2

Make it static, final, initialize it and use ConcurrentHashMap.

You can even have a singleton class for this, and make it lazy.

Something like this. But again, use ConcurrentHashmap. Dont use Hashtable.

import java.util.*;

class Foo { 
        private static final Foo foo = new Foo(); 
        public static final Hashtable table = new Hashtable(); 
        private Foo(){} 

        public static Foo Instance(){
            return foo;
        }

} 
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FYI, here's a fun example: class Foo { private static final Foo foo = new Foo(); private static final HashTable table = new HashTable(); private Foo(){ System.out.println(table); } } Guess what that prints? –  LazyCubicleMonkey Dec 5 '11 at 0:17
    
doenst print. there is no HashTable, should be Hashtable. –  DarthVader Dec 5 '11 at 0:19
    
Touche. But if it was spelled correctly, it would be null. –  LazyCubicleMonkey Dec 5 '11 at 0:28
    
I edited and put the code. that must work right? you made me typed that. i m lazier than u . –  DarthVader Dec 5 '11 at 0:30
    
That works. I was just pointing out that if you reference table in the constructor of Foo, it would be null. –  LazyCubicleMonkey Dec 5 '11 at 0:35

I want to initialize a hashtable inside my class only once for my web application.

If you only want there to be one instance for your webapp then your choices are:

  • a bare static (nasty!!),

  • a static wrapped by a class with static methods (nasty, and awkward to use),

  • an static wrapped using the Singleton class pattern (not so nasty / awkward, but not without problems), or

  • a shared instance that is created and injected using a dependency injection (DI) framework.

The last is best from a number of perspectives, but it entails changing your webapp to use DI, which will be disruptive.

So I suggest that you read up on the Singleton class pattern and how to implement it in Java so that it is created and initialized in a thread-safe fashion:

Then there is the separate question/issue of how you use the hash table in a thread-safe fashion. And the answers/solutions depend on how your application is going to use the hash table once it has been initialized.

  • If the webapp only ever reads the hash table, then a plain HashMap is sufficient.

  • If the webapp needs to read and update the hash table, then the choice is between a ConcurrentHashMap or a synchronized wrapper for a regular HashMap.

    • If the table is likely to have lots of threads wanting to perform operations (i.e. lock contention is a likely issue), OR if you need to be able to iterate the table entries while updates might be happening, then use a ConcurrentHashMap.

    • Otherwise, a HashMap with a synchronization wrapper will be sufficient.

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