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I've recently begun working with a large, legacy enterprise Java application. It's primarily built on Websphere Commerce 6. It contains a mix of EJB 1.x and 2.x along with quite a bit of code that hooks directly into the Commerce API.

I've introduced the first unit tests while attempting to break dependancies and carefully refactor small portions of the code. We've been exploring the idea of using an integration testing framework to make the process of creating tests less fragile and time consuming.

Arquillian has been suggested as a very good option for integration testing. However, it looks geared towards more "modern" applications; most of the examples make use of Java EE 5+ and Maven. We're using J2EE and Ant. We're also currently tied to Java 1.4, and while it may be possible for us to move to Java 5, we won't be upgrading to EJB 3.x any time soon. We're also likely to stick with Ant.

With these constraints in mind, is it possible to use Arquillian? Or do better alternatives exist for integration testing legacy enterprise Java applications?

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Arquillian has been suggested as a very good option for integration testing. However, it looks geared towards more "modern" applications; most of the examples make use of Java EE 5+ and Maven. We're using J2EE and Ant. We're also currently tied to Java 1.4, and while it may be possible for us to move to Java 5, we won't be upgrading to EJB 3.x any time soon. We're also likely to stick with Ant.

With these constraints in mind, is it possible to use Arquillian?

Note: I'm an Arquillian contributor. I've tried to be unbiased in my answer.

This would really depend on how your tests are executed. If you are attempting to use Arquillian's support for in-container tests, then you're unlikely to find a solution. WebSphere Commerce 6 uses WebSphere 6.0 as the underlying container, which is not supported by Arquillian at the moment. If you can hypothetically use a version of WebSphere Commerce that uses WAS 7.0 or 8.0 as the foundation, then most of my answer can be ignored, since these containers are supported.

You can attempt to run tests from the client using the @RunAsClient annotation, instead of the container, and this is more likely to succeed. Note that, you'll need to perform the deployment in some manner without a @Deployment annotated method, because of the afore-mentioned absence of support for WAS 6 in Arquillian.

If you intend to use Ant instead of Maven, then the only requirement is that all dependencies be present in the classpath. Unfortunately, there is no uber JAR or distribution for Arquillian, so for now, you'll need to know all the dependencies upfront.

Note - Building in WebSphere 6.0 support for Arquillian may not be a trivial activity, as compared to other more recent containers:

  • Firstly, there have to be means for deploying the archive. I'm not sure if the mechanism used in WebSphere 7 and 8 container support can be ported over.
  • Supporting in-container tests in Arquillian for WAS 6.0 may require supporting the Servlet 2.4 protocol for running tests. Currently, Arquillian supports Servlet Spec 2.5 and 3.0 for packaging it's ServletTestRunner. This is of course, necessary if the JMX protocol and the accompanying JMXTestRunner cannot be used.

Or do better alternatives exist for integration testing legacy enterprise Java applications?

I would normally advise folks to use a mix of Cargo and JUnit for functional testing legacy apps, but even Cargo does not appear to support WebSphere 6.0.

You might find JUnitEE to be a better fit for your needs if you are willing to package the JUnitEE TestRunner in your archive; note that JUnitEE's last release was in 2004, and the mailing list is a bit inactive, so YMMV.

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Thanks very much! I'm going to explore JUnitEE for the time being and re-evaluate Arquillian if/when we upgrade to WSC 7.0. – Kevin Webber Dec 6 '11 at 1:23

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