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With ReSharper 6.0 I've received a new warning:

redundant comma in array initializer

for the case when I have a list of array initializer parameters with comma in the end.

What bad in that? Why I like "my" approach is that I often need to comment the latest value and don't want to bother with fixing those 'leading' commas:

    private readonly string[] _tables
        = new[]
              {
                  "users",
                  "user_account",
                  "user_budget_type",
                  //"user_budget"
              };

Please advise what is good in following that suggestion.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
1  
Uninstall ReSharper!;) –  Reza ArabQaeni Dec 5 '11 at 1:30
1  
Disable the warning in question. As you yourself observe, it's completely useless. Don't let your tools redefine the way you work for no good reason. –  Pavel Minaev Dec 5 '11 at 1:34
    
This is why I don't use ReSharper - one of the reasons at least –  Adam Rackis Dec 5 '11 at 1:47
1  
@PavelMinaev warning are here to help you. Having a comma at the end might confuse a futur reader: Why is there a ending comma? Is it because there is an element missing? How can he know? Having a useless trailling comma is like leaving your left flasher on the hightway. Nobody can know for sure if you are ever going to change lane. –  Drahakar Dec 5 '11 at 6:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The clue is in the text of the message:

redundant comma in array initializer

What does it mean by that? Well, your code:

private readonly string[] _tables
    = new[]
          {
              "users",
              "user_account",
              "user_budget_type",
              //"user_budget"
          };

and the code with the inspection acted upon:

private readonly string[] _tables
    = new[]
          {
              "users",
              "user_account",
              "user_budget_type"
              //"user_budget"
          };

are semantically equivalent. That is, the CIL produced in each case is identical - there is no difference in behaviour. So the comma changes nothing and is therefore redundant.

Now, as to your question:

What bad in that?

That's largely up to you. R# merely has this redundancy as an inspection, but it is you (through your acceptance of the default settings) that has it categorised as a warning.

If this construct is acceptable to your style, then by all means go ahead and change the Inspection Severity in R# options; but in general, the defaults for R# options are those that produce pretty close to the minimum amount of code necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
Good explanation of motivation. Thanks a lot! –  Budda Apr 26 '12 at 22:53

I agree that it shouldn't matter that there is a comma at the end, however, if you write your arrays like so, you don't have this problem.

private readonly string[] _tables
    = new[]
          {
              "users"
              ,"user_account"
              ,"user_budget_type"
              //,"user_budget"
          };
share|improve this answer
4  
If you write your arrays like this, you will have a new problem: they don't look right. ;) –  Matthew Iselin Dec 5 '11 at 1:31
    
I would never, ever do this, but +1 for creativity :) –  Adam Rackis Dec 5 '11 at 1:48
    
I did use that earlier (in C++ times), but in this case you will have problem when comment the first line. But ok, my main concerns is that there are no problems with leaving comma –  Budda Dec 5 '11 at 2:33
    
Yuck. Also it now looks like there's a missing initial comma. So all you've done is moved the problem from the end to the start :) –  demoncodemonkey Oct 21 '12 at 9:53

ReSharper is full of suggestions. Just like any other productivity tool, in the end it's up to you whether to act upon those suggestions.

For example, while the C# language allows a trailing comma or an empty control statement bodies (placing a ; for a loop body), or even typing duplicate ;; at the end of the statement. For all those things ReSharper will suggest you removing redundancies, because it's what it does - heuristically detects redundancies. If you know better, there are several ways you could "silence" ReSharper from suggesting it:

  1. Temp. suppress the warning using special comments (choose the "Suppress inspection ... with comment" quickfix):

    private readonly string[] _tables = new[]
    {
        "users",
        "user_account",
    // ReSharper disable RedundantCommaInArrayInitializer
        "user_budget_type",
    // ReSharper restore RedundantCommaInArrayInitializer
        //"user_budget"
    };
    

or 2. Suppress this warning completely by selecting "Inspection options for ...", and choosing "Do not show" in the options.

It's all about choice and personal preference - you can configure just about anything you want in the tool.

share|improve this answer

You can suppress that warning, Resharper is just saying that, just in case you care :)

share|improve this answer
1  
I know, my question was: why ReSharper think that redundant comman is evil? –  Budda Dec 5 '11 at 4:08
1  
its not evil, its redundant, resharper will suggest to remove any redundant code. –  Keith Nicholas Dec 5 '11 at 19:30

@Budda, Unlike other have said, this redundant comma is eval! In some browsers, for example IE8, this could cause the browser to misunderstand you and mis-create the object.

See this answer for example, where the trailing comma caused the Highcharts library to stop working.

Keeping your code clean is not only a matter of easier reading and debugging. Even if you see your code working with this comma, it doesn't mean that it will be working the same with all browsers.

share|improve this answer
    
Valid, but that only mean that syntax style checks should be language specific: you should not apply R# rules for C# to JS code, etc. –  Budda May 17 '14 at 23:32
    
I see now that your question was addressing C#. It wasn't specified in the question, but the example is clear. Sorry. –  Mohoch May 18 '14 at 5:56

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