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I am using fputs to write strings to file, but under the debug mode, the content is not written to disk after the statement fputs. I think there is some buffer. But I would like to debug to check whether the logic is correct by viewing the content directly. Is there anyway to disable the buffer? Thanks.

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2  
fflush() the file. –  Kevin Dec 5 '11 at 3:31
2  
Yes, set the second parameter of setbuf to NULL like this setbuf(myfilepointer, NULL);. –  Jesse Good Dec 5 '11 at 3:32
2  
You guys know there's an awesome field down below labeled "Your Answer" where you can post this stuff –  Michael Mrozek Dec 5 '11 at 3:35
1  
They've probably been burned by down voters! –  Will Bickford Dec 5 '11 at 3:36
1  
I'd need to find a whole 10 more characters to post it as an actual answer! –  Kevin Dec 5 '11 at 4:10
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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You have a couple of alternatives:

  • fflush(f); to flush the buffer at a certain point.
  • setbuf(f, NULL); to disable buffering.

Where f is obviously your FILE*.

ie.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
   char s[100];

   FILE *f = fopen("test.txt", "w");
   setbuf(f, NULL);

   while (fgets(s, 100, stdin))
      fputs(s, f);

   return 0;
}

OR

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
   char s[100];

   FILE *f = fopen("test.txt", "w");

   while (fgets(s, 100, stdin)) {
      fputs(s, f);
      fflush(f);
   }

   return 0;
}
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+2, but it was impossible, so +1 only. –  Beginner Dec 5 '11 at 3:40
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I don't know if you can't disable the buffer, but you can force it to write in disk using fflush

More about it: (C++ reference, but just the same as in C): http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/fflush/

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You are referencing to a C++ header, although the question is tagged with C. –  Beginner Dec 5 '11 at 3:32
    
@Beginner: it's exactly the same stuff .. but I guess you're right, I'll add a warning –  juliomalegria Dec 5 '11 at 3:36
    
It's not... believe me :) Make better reference to POSIX standard. But actually it would be even better to delete your answer, as I did it with mine... @AusCBloke has give a full answer. –  Beginner Dec 5 '11 at 3:38
    
@Beginner it is the same, at least in this case, and especially since: C++ : Reference : C Library : cstdio (stdio.h) : fflush –  AusCBloke Dec 5 '11 at 3:40
    
@AusCBloke I just find this misleading (because of C++ there). This reference would be much better I think pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/007904875/functions/fflush.html The link contains cstdio which is different from string.h. –  Beginner Dec 5 '11 at 3:43
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