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I'm trying to learn Java and I've got everything setup and I'm running. I created a constructor for my first model and went to setup a constructor function that accepts a parameter. I added this function:

public Guest(String name) {
    this.name = name;
    this.signingDate = new Date(System.currentTimeMillis());
}

Netbeans threw an error saying I needed a default constructor. The error went away when I changed it to:

public Guest() {
}

public Guest(String name) {
    this.name = name;
    this.signingDate = new Date(System.currentTimeMillis());
}

I can't imagine that this is how you create optional parameters within Java. So it brings up 2 questions:

  1. Why do I need a default constructor?
  2. How do I create optional parameters?
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An entity class must have a no-argument public or protected constructor.

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Yes. Java supports method / constructor overloading.

You don't "need" the default constructor. However, NetBeans is being helpful to you, and informing you that you need one because it assumes you are creating a bean - which requires the option to be created without a constructor requiring parameters - because the calling code wouldn't know what to populate into these.

For "optional" parameters, you can define as many constructors as you would need - with each one omitting one or more of the "optional" parameters.

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Why do I need a default constructor?

I think you are trying to call new Guest() and have only one constructor in Guest class that is Guest(String arg). And that's why it is showing error that you need to create a constructor with no arguments that is default constructor of a class.

How do I create optional parameters?

If you want to make a constructor with 0 more arguments you need to use ... in argument. Ex:

public class Testing {
    public Testing(String... str) {
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Testing testing = new Testing();
        Testing testing1 = new Testing("1");
        Testing testing2 = new Testing("2","1");
    }
}
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The original question is a bit vague, so this is not necessarily incorrect - but the proper name for the "..." are actually "varargs". These require arguments of all of the same type (e.g. Strings, as in the example above) - and the varargs argument must be the last argument accepted by the method. –  ziesemer Dec 5 '11 at 4:05
1  
Yes it will accept same type of arguments and if you want multiple then you can use Object.... May be it works. –  Harry Joy Dec 5 '11 at 4:07
1  
An Object... vararg seems like a pretty bad way of implementing optional args. It means you lose all type safety and have to unit test the hell out of your ctor (ditto if it were a normal instance method). An overload (multiple construtors) would be much better. –  yshavit Dec 5 '11 at 4:59
    
What if I want to restrict types.... IE - parameter 1 is an integer, 2 a string, 3 an object, but they're all optional –  Webnet Dec 6 '11 at 3:07
    
@Webnet: You can use Object... but as said by 'yshavit' it is pretty bad way to do. –  Harry Joy Dec 6 '11 at 4:00

Another scenario where you'd need no-arg constrcutors is when you have subclasses.

For example,


class Car {

 Engine engine;
 Car(Engine e)
   {
     // do something
   }

 }

And you have a subclass,


class Benz extends Car
 {
   Benz()
   { 
   }
 }

Now you can't instantiate a Benz object. The reason is, when a new Benz() instantiation is attempeted, the parent constructor is first invoked.

i.e,


class Benz extends Car
 {
   Benz()
   {
     super(); //implicitly added 
   }
 }

By default, it tries to invoke a no-arg constructor of the super-class. So you'd need one, unless you have an explicit super(arg) call like this:


class Benz extends Car
 {
   Benz()
   {
     super(new Engine()); 
   }
 }

Note: A simple Java rule to remember A no-arg constructor is provided by default as long as you don't have another constructor with argument.

i.e

 class Car{} 
is equivalent to
class Car{ Car() }

But when you write,

 class Car{ Car(Engine e){} }
there is no no-arg constructor provided by default. You'll have to explicitly code
 class Car{ Car(){} Car(Engine e)} 
if you needed it.

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If you're using a POJO (Plain Old Java Object) than you need a default constructor only if you create an instance of this object by invoking no-argument constructor like Guest g = new Guest().
That's pretty obvious - you want to use no-argument constructor - you need to have one.

If you don't specify any constructor, the compiler will generate one (default, no-argument) for you. If you specify at least one constructor by yourself - the compiler won't generate any as it assumes that you know what you're doing.

However, if you're creating a JPA entity (so you have @Entity at the top of your class) than you need a default constructor as it's a JPA requirement.
It's because instances of your class are created by the JPA provider when you fetch them from the database. The JPA provider has to have a way to instantiate your Entity.
If you'd have only parametrized constructor - how the JPA would know what parameters should it pass?

There are no optional parameters in Java like there are in i.e. PHP world where you can define myMethod($var1, $var2 = null, $var3 = 2);. In Java world we use overloaded methods and varargs.

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