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Here is what I have so far, it is not working:

class Couple(o,t)
  one = o
  two = t
end

couple1 = Couple.new(10, "Ten")
p couple1.one
p couple1.two

Not sure why it's not working?

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Surely will, I am just starting. –  antonpug Dec 5 '11 at 14:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Defining a class doesn't work like defining functions, you have to define functions on them that use the internal variables, and the the initializer that tells it what to do when calling .new

attr_accessor helps with the crud of setting up the functions and variables. The most simplest ways would be to use have a class like

class Couple
  attr_accessor :one, :two
end

couple1 = Couple.new
couple1.one = 10
couple1.two = "Ten"
p couple1.one
p couple1.two

To use the new function to initialize the class with a few variables, you can define that function giving you a Class definition looking like

class Couple
  attr_accessor :one, :two

  def initialize(one, two)
    @one = one
    @two = two
  end
end

couple1 = Couple.new(10, "Ten")
p couple1.one
p couple1.two
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If you need to just hold a pair of items, then use Struct. It's a simple generator of classes that contain only variables and accessors, and nothing else (similar co C/C++'s Struct).

Couple = Struct.new(:one, :two)

# Or more idiomatically
class Couple < Struct.new(:one, :two)
  def to_s
    "one: #{self.one}, two: #{self.two}"
  end
end

couple1 = Couple.new(10, 'ten')
puts couple1  # one: 10, two: ten

couple1.one = 100
puts couple1  # one: 100, two: ten

Also, one very interesting thing in Ruby is that the class data/members, both instance and class/static ones are "private" -- you can access them from outside only via accessor methods, not directly, and Ruby gives you the possibility to quicky generate these methods with the macros atrr_accessor, attr_reader, and attr_writer.

class Couple
  one = 'o'
  two = 't'
end

p Couple.one  # NoMethodError: undefined method `one' for Couple:Class


class Couple
  def initialize(one, two)
    @one = one
    @two = two
  end
end

c = Couple.new(10, 'ten')
p c.one  # undefined method `one' for #<Couple:0x936d2d4 @one=10, @two="ten">

That's why you need the accessors.

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You need to use attr_reader for read or attr_accessor for read/write to access the class variables. Your class should look like this:

class Couple
  attr_accessor :one, :two

  def initialize(one, two)
    @one = one
    @two = two
  end
end

Using attr_accessor will create, in this case, the methods one, one=, two, two=. If you were to use attr_reader, it would create the methods one, two.

Using the example above code, you could have:

couple = Couple.new(5, 6)
p couple.one # Outputs 5
p couple.two # Outputs 6
couple.one = 7
p couple.one # Outputs 7

There is also attr_writer, which will give you the methods one=, two=, but this isn't what you're looking for in this case. It gives you write only access to a variable.

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