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What's the fastest way to enumerate through an integer and return the exponent of each bit that is turned on? Have seen an example using << and another using Math.Pow. Wondering if there is anything else that's really fast.

Thanks.

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2  
In my own experience Math.Pow is very very slow. Much slower than even, say, Math.Cos or Math.Sqrt. It has no chance to outperform integer shifts, ever. –  romkyns Oct 6 '09 at 11:50
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9 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I imagine bit-shifting would be the fastest. Untested, but I think the following ought to be fast (as fast as IEnumerables are at least).

IEnumerable<int> GetExponents(Int32 value)
{
    for(int i=0; i<32; i++)
    {
        if(value & 1)
            yield return i;
        value >>= 1;
    }
}

If you want it to be faster, you might consider returning a List<int> instead.

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Can this be done in linq??? int32Value.ForEach(....) ??? –  Pure.Krome May 8 '09 at 4:35
    
I'm not exactly sure what you mean by int32Value but in order to use the ForEach extension method, you have to have an IList. You can call ToList() on an IEnumerable to get one if you'd like. And if you want, you can make the above code an extension method and call myInt.GetExponents().ToList().ForEach(...) –  lc. May 8 '09 at 4:49
    
You can try aggregate in linq. –  leppie May 8 '09 at 8:54
1  
Shouldn't your loop start at zero? ie, The first bit represents exponent 0, the second bit represents exponent 1 and so on. (2^0 = 1, 2^1 = 2, 2^2 = 4 etc). –  LukeH May 8 '09 at 11:38
    
Right...and that would be me overthinking the problem on not enough sleep. Fixed. –  lc. May 10 '09 at 9:52
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The fastest way? Lookup tables are almost always the fastest way. Build an int[][] array with four billion entries, one for each int, containing an array of the numbers you want. Initializing the table will take some time, of course but the lookups will be incredibly fast.

I note that you have not said what "fastest" means with sufficient precision for anyone to actually answer the question. Does it mean fastest amortized time including startup time, or marginal lookup time assuming that startup costs can be neglected? My solution sketch assumes the latter.

Obviously a 32 bit machine with 2 billion bytes of address space will not have enough address space to store thirty billion bytes of arrays. Get yourself a 64 bit machine. You'll need at least that much physical memory installed as well if you want it to be fast -- the paging is going to kill you otherwise.

I sure hope the couple of nanoseconds you save on every lookup are worth buying all that extra hardware. Or maybe you don't actually want the fastest way?

:-)

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2  
lol, great response! –  Brannon May 8 '09 at 6:17
7  
What an arsehole response... but great! :) –  Charlie Somerville May 8 '09 at 8:55
2  
What are you, comicbook guy? Obviously, he wanted the fastest reasonable method. –  Blorgbeard May 8 '09 at 12:16
14  
Then someone needs to define "reasonable". Once you define "reasonable", you have a performance specification. "Fastest possible" is not a specification. By thinking about what the costs are of the fastest possible implementation, you start to realize that performance is not ever about "fastest possible". It's about obtaining a reasonable performance return on an investment. Performance tuning is expensive; without a realistic spec, you can spend a lot of money trying to reach a level of performance you don't actually need. –  Eric Lippert May 8 '09 at 17:05
4  
Huge lookup tables are quite frequently not the fastest way to implement stuff. Since we almost certainly get a cache miss a lookup will need in the order of hundred(s) of cycles. Any of the other proposed methods beats that easily. –  Accipitridae May 9 '09 at 10:56
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A lookup array for one byte's worth of bits ought to be close to the fastest you can do in safe C# code. Shift each of the 4 bytes out of the integer (casting to uint as necessary) and index into the array.

The elements of the lookup array could be an array of exponents, or, depending on what you're doing with the bits, perhaps delegates that do work.

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++ I like this, except that then it becomes an issue of efficiently collecting the results. Each element of the lookup table can be an array of exponents, but then you have to concatenate them, and add 8, 16, and 24 to each array. Not sure how many cycles that would take. –  Mike Dunlavey May 10 '09 at 21:59
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The IEnumerable is not going to perform. Optimization of some examples in this topic:

First one (fastest - 2.35 seconds for 10M runs, range 1..10M):

static uint[] MulDeBruijnBitPos = new uint[32] 
{
  0, 1, 28, 2, 29, 14, 24, 3, 30, 22, 20, 15, 25, 17, 4, 8, 
  31, 27, 13, 23, 21, 19, 16, 7, 26, 12, 18, 6, 11, 5, 10, 9
};

static uint[] GetExponents(uint value)
{
    uint[] data = new uint[32];
    int enabledBitCounter = 0;

    while (value != 0)
    {
        uint m = (value & (0 - value));
        value ^= m;
        data[enabledBitCounter++] = MulDeBruijnBitPos[(m * (uint)0x077CB531U) >> 27];
    }

    Array.Resize<uint>(ref data, enabledBitCounter);
    return data;
}

Another version (second fastest - 3 seconds for 10M runs, range 1..10M):

static uint[] GetExponents(uint value)
{
    uint[] data = new uint[32];
    int enabledBitCounter = 0;

    for (uint i = 0; value > 0; ++i)
    {
        if ((value & 1) == 1)
            data[enabledBitCounter++] = i;
        value >>= 1;
    }

    Array.Resize<uint>(ref data, enabledBitCounter);
    return data;
}
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+1 for actually benchmarking –  Tony Lee May 9 '09 at 16:27
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Just for fun, here's a one-liner using LINQ.

It's certainly not the fastest way to do it, although it's not far behind the other answers that use yield and iterator blocks.

int test = 42;

// returns 1, 3, 5
//   2^1 + 2^3 + 2^5
// =   2 +   8 +  32
// = 42
var exponents = Enumerable.Range(0, 32).Where(x => ((test >> x) & 1) == 1);

For a speedier solution I would probably return a plain collection rather than using an iterator block. Something like this:

int test = 2458217;

// returns 0, 3, 5, 6, 9, 15, 16, 18, 21
//   2^0 + 2^3 + 2^5 + 2^6 + 2^9 +  2^15 +  2^16 +   2^18 +    2^21
// =   1 +   8 +  32 +  64 + 512 + 32768 + 65536 + 262144 + 2097152
// = 2458217
var exponents = GetExponents(test);

// ...

public static List<int> GetExponents(int source)
{
    List<int> result = new List<int>(32);

    for (int i = 0; i < 32; i++)
    {
        if (((source >> i) & 1) == 1)
        {
            result.Add(i);
        }
    }

    return result;
}
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+1 for the one-liner version –  Tony Lee May 8 '09 at 17:05
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I guess bit shifting (<<) is the fastest.

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Fastest given what distribution for the input? If typically only one bit is set, then this could be faster than looping through looking for set bits.

Taking from the accepted answer for finding the position of the least significant bit, which took from Bit Twiddling Hacks, this solutions loops, finding, clearing and returning the position of each consecutive least-significant-bit.

   static int[] MulDeBruijnBitPos = new int[32] 
    {
      0, 1, 28, 2, 29, 14, 24, 3, 30, 22, 20, 15, 25, 17, 4, 8, 
      31, 27, 13, 23, 21, 19, 16, 7, 26, 12, 18, 6, 11, 5, 10, 9
    };

    static IEnumerable<int> GetExponents(UInt32 v)
    {
        UInt32 m;

        while( v != 0 ) {
          m = (v & (UInt32) (-v));
          yield return MulDeBruijnBitPos[((UInt32) (m * 0x077CB531U)) >> 27];
          v ^= m;
        }
    }

It only loops as many times as there are bits set.

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A far simpler and clearer solution is to use a small (either 16 or 256 entries) lookup table. –  Sinan Ünür May 8 '09 at 12:18
    
It's really hard to beat lc's answer for simplicity and clarity. –  Tony Lee May 8 '09 at 15:44
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Apologies for the C implementation. I am going to learn C# one of these days

I make no statement that this is the 'fastest'. For that, you are going to have to benchmark a variety of solutions with the type of data you expect and the usage scenario you plan.

#include <stdio.h>


int numbits(unsigned int n) {
    static int lookup_table[] = {
        /* 0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  a  b  c  d  e  f */
           0, 1, 1, 2, 1, 2, 2, 3, 1, 2, 2, 3, 2, 3, 3, 4,
    };

    return 
        lookup_table[ (n & 0xF0000000) >> 28 ] +
        lookup_table[ (n & 0x0F000000) >> 24 ] +
        lookup_table[ (n & 0x00F00000) >> 20 ] +
        lookup_table[ (n & 0x000F0000) >> 16 ] +
        lookup_table[ (n & 0x0000F000) >> 12 ] +
        lookup_table[ (n & 0x00000F00) >>  8 ] +
        lookup_table[ (n & 0x000000F0) >>  4 ] +
        lookup_table[ (n & 0x0000000F) ];
}

int main(void) {
    int i;

    unsigned int testvals[] = {
        0,
        0x01010101,
        0xf0f0f0f0,
        0xffffffff,
        0x11111111,
        0x22222222,
        0x44444444,
        0x99999999,
        0x5aa5a55a,
        0xdeadbeef,
    };

    for ( i = 0; i < sizeof testvals/sizeof testvals[0]; ++i ) {
        printf( "%8.8x\t%2d\n", testvals[i], numbits(testvals[i]));    
    }

    return 0;
}

/*
    C:\Temp> cl /nologo /O1 bits.c
    bits.c

    C:\Temp> bits
    00000000         0
    01010101         4
    f0f0f0f0        16
    ffffffff        32
    11111111         8
    22222222         8
    44444444         8
    99999999        16
    5aa5a55a        16
    deadbeef        24
*/
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This just counts the number of bits that are set. It doesn't return the exponents. –  LukeH May 8 '09 at 13:14
    
I completely missed that in the problem description. Apologies and thank you for pointing it out. –  Sinan Ünür May 8 '09 at 17:22
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If you won't choke on a little C++:

 void func(int i, int& n, int a[]){
  n = 0;
  if (i < 0) a[n++] = 31;
  i <<= 1;
  if (i < 0) a[n++] = 30;
  i <<= 1;
  if (i < 0) a[n++] = 29;
  i <<= 1;

  ...

  if (i < 0) a[n++] = 0;
}
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