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Hi all I was wondering if there is a way to implement this method without casting to a wider data type (e.g. long, double, etc)?

CanTimes(int a, int b){
    returns true if a * b is within the range of -2^31 to 2^31-1, else false;
}

For example, we could implement one for the method CanAdd (without casts) as such:

    public static boolean CanPlus(int a, int b) {
        if (b >= 0) {
            return a <= Integer.MAX_VALUE - b
        } else {
            return a >= Integer.MIN_VALUE - b
        }
    }

Implementation language is Java, though of course this is more of a language-agnostic problem.

I was thinking if there's some logic we can employ to decide if a * b fits the range of an integer without casting it to a wider data type?

Solution ! based on Strelok's comment:

public static boolean CanTimes(int a, int b) {
    if (a == 0 || b == 0) {
        return true;
    }
    if (a > 0) {
        if (b > 0) {
            return a <= Integer.MAX_VALUE / b;
        } else {
            return a <= Integer.MIN_VALUE / b;
        }
    } else {
        if (b > 0) {
            return b <= Integer.MIN_VALUE / a;
        } else {
            return a <= -Integer.MAX_VALUE / b;
        }
    }
}
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Why? Why the artificial restriction? –  EJP Dec 5 '11 at 6:07
    
Maybe you can do something with Integer.numberOfLeadingZeros. If the sum of both leading zeros is greater than 31 it will still be an int, or something like this. –  Thilo Dec 5 '11 at 6:10
    
@EJP It's not an artificial restriction, I'm wondering if there's a way to do it without having to cast to a wider data type. For example, HeadGeek has a half-solution here stackoverflow.com/a/199455/632951. His is an estimate though I was interested in how we could improve it such that it actually works. –  Pacerier Dec 5 '11 at 6:13
4  
A small amount of Googling turned up this: java2s.com/Tutorial/Java/0040__Data-Type/… which is for longs, but obviously it is only seconds from being adapted to ints. –  Strelok Dec 5 '11 at 6:18
    
@Strelok Wow good stuff! sometimes the simple things are the hard ones to think about. –  Pacerier Dec 5 '11 at 6:43
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As per my comment, here is the adapted version, with some unit tests:

public static int mulAndCheck( int a, int b )
{
    int ret;
    String msg = "overflow: multiply";
    if ( a > b )
    {
        // use symmetry to reduce boundry cases
        ret = mulAndCheck( b, a );
    }
    else
    {
        if ( a < 0 )
        {
            if ( b < 0 )
            {
                // check for positive overflow with negative a, negative b
                if ( a >= Integer.MAX_VALUE / b )
                {
                    ret = a * b;
                }
                else
                {
                    throw new ArithmeticException( msg );
                }
            }
            else if ( b > 0 )
            {
                // check for negative overflow with negative a, positive b
                if ( Integer.MIN_VALUE / b <= a )
                {
                    ret = a * b;
                }
                else
                {
                    throw new ArithmeticException( msg );

                }
            }
            else
            {
                // assert b == 0
                ret = 0;
            }
        }
        else if ( a > 0 )
        {
            // assert a > 0
            // assert b > 0

            // check for positive overflow with positive a, positive b
            if ( a <= Integer.MAX_VALUE / b )
            {
                ret = a * b;
            }
            else
            {
                throw new ArithmeticException( msg );
            }
        }
        else
        {
            // assert a == 0
            ret = 0;
        }
    }
    return ret;
}

@Test( expected = ArithmeticException.class )
public void testOverflow()
{
    mulAndCheck( Integer.MAX_VALUE, Integer.MAX_VALUE );
}

@Test( expected = ArithmeticException.class )
public void testOverflow1()
{
    mulAndCheck( Integer.MIN_VALUE, Integer.MAX_VALUE );
}

@Test
public void testTimesMinus1()
{
    Assert.assertEquals( Integer.MIN_VALUE + 1, mulAndCheck( Integer.MAX_VALUE, -1 ) );
    Assert.assertEquals( Integer.MAX_VALUE, mulAndCheck( Integer.MIN_VALUE + 1, -1 ) );
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is blatant plagiarism from this post! –  Bohemian Dec 5 '11 at 23:11
    
@Bohemian I'm pretty sure I posted where this is adapted from in my comment to the OP: "A small amount of Googling turned up this: java2s.com/Tutorial/Java/0040__Data-Type/… which is for longs, but obviously it is only seconds from being adapted to ints." Anyway, you are not adding anything valuable to the discussion here. –  Strelok Dec 5 '11 at 23:22
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You can do the multiplication and then check whether dividing by one factor still gives the other.

EDIT

The above doesn't work all the time, as Dietrich Epp points out; it fails for -1 and Integer.MIN_VALUE. I don't know if there are any other edge cases. If not, then it would be easy to check for this one case.

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Interesting. Does this work reliably? Or are there edge cases that result in false positives? –  Thilo Dec 5 '11 at 6:05
    
The algorithm will fail for a=-1, b=-0x80000000. a*b=-0x80000000 (overflow), but (a*b)/a == b because overflow happens during the check as well. –  Dietrich Epp Dec 5 '11 at 6:18
1  
@Thilo - I thought it was reliable, but a little example (if I did it right) makes me think it isn't. In 2-bit, 2's complement arithmetic, 11 * 10 (i.e., -1 * -2) gives 10 (which is wrong). But 10 / 11 gives 10, so it would pass the test. A better test would be to divide the largest (magnitude) number allowed by one factor and test that the result is less (in magnitude) than the other factor. Separate tests are needed for each sign combination, I think. –  Ted Hopp Dec 5 '11 at 6:27
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Mathematically, the sum of the log-base-2 should be less than 232. Unfortunately, Math doesn't give us log base 2, but this is still simple enough:

static boolean canMultiply(int a, int b) {
    return Math.log(Math.abs(a)) + Math.log(Math.abs(b)) <= Math.log(Integer.MAX_VALUE);
}

EDITED: Due to (fair) flak, how about this simple approach that addresses OP's question exactly?

static boolean canMultiply(int a, int b) {
    return a == 0 || ((a * b) / a) == b;
}

If there's an overflow, dividing by the original number won't bring us back to starting number.
Importantly, this will work for longs, which can't be cast up.

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1  
heys cool =D, however the Math.log turns it into a double =X –  Pacerier Dec 5 '11 at 7:03
    
This doesn't work all the time. If the (mathematical) product is negative, the limit to check against is -Integer.MIN_VALUE. –  Ted Hopp Dec 5 '11 at 7:03
    
@TedHopp Yes - there is an edge case of the product being exactly Integer.MIN_VALUE not being covered, but log is not that precise anyway. If you can live with this edge case, this solution would be acceptable. (The use of Math.abs() makes negative results still correctly checked) –  Bohemian Dec 5 '11 at 7:09
    
I don't think "log is not that precise anyway" is much of a defense of Integer.MIN_VALUE not being covered. You're just saying "yes, OK, there's an input it gets wrong, but then there are other inputs it gets wrong anyway". What if the questioner wants the solution to be correct? –  Steve Jessop Dec 5 '11 at 10:10
    
Btw is it guaranteed that if there's an overflow, dividing by the original number wouldn't bring us back to the starting number regardless of the inputs? –  Pacerier Dec 7 '11 at 1:46
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Since the multiplication of a*b is the same as a+a+a+... repeated b times (and vice-versa), you can do something like this:

(I renamed your CanMultiple() function to isIntMultiplication(), since I think its more clear )

public boolean isIntMultiplication(int a, int b) {
    // signs are not important in this context
    a = Math.abs(a);
    b = Math.abs(b);
    // optimization: I want to calculate a*b as the sum of a by itself repeated b times, so make sure b is the smaller one
    // i.e., 100*2 is calculated as 100+100 which is faster than summing 2+2+2+... a hundred times
    if (b > a) { int swap = a; a = b; b = swap; }

    int n = 0, total = a;
    while(++n < b) {
        if (total <= Integer.MAX_VALUE - a) {
            total += a;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

You see it in action:

// returns true, Integer.MAX_VALUE * 1 is still an int    
isIntMultiplication(Integer.MAX_VALUE, 1);

// returns false, Integer.MAX_VALUE * 2 is a long    
isIntMultiplication(Integer.MAX_VALUE, 2);

// returns true, Integer.MAX_VALUE/2 * 2 is still an int
isIntMultiplication(Integer.MAX_VALUE/2, 2);

// returns false, Integer.MAX_VALUE * Integer.MAX_VALUE is a long
isIntMultiplication(Integer.MAX_VALUE, Integer.MAX_VALUE);

This solution does not use long types, as required.

share|improve this answer
    
Signs are important because -Integer.MIN_VALUE > Integer.MAX_VALUE (mathematically). –  Ted Hopp Dec 5 '11 at 7:05
    
Hmm, the approach works (although the sign does need sorting out), but I think 64k additions in the worst case can probably be beaten for performance... –  Steve Jessop Dec 5 '11 at 10:22
    
I like the idea of swapping the left and right choosing the smaller one to loop on, though it's still pretty slow. –  Pacerier Dec 5 '11 at 15:57
    
@Pacerier: could be worse, the check for addition overflow could be implemented as repeated ++total, with a check that total != Integer.MAX_VALUE ;-) –  Steve Jessop Dec 6 '11 at 10:39
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