Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working through a Parallel Programming example on Race conditions

In the example they are demonstrating the isolation patter to deal with race conditions

Why is it in this example following that a race condition does not occur when creating the task and the stateObject is passed as part of the task creation

I understand that we use isolatedBalance to do the updateing ...but at the point where we assign the isolatedbalance = (int)stateObject could not another tasks finished balance be there i.e not 0 but 100 ???

So if there where enough tasks and that the task scheduler started an early task and it finished at a point when a later task is being created and assinged the account.Balance value would be 100 etc for when 1 of the tasks had finshed for a taks that was starting

class BankAccount
{
    public int Balance { get; set; } 
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        var account = new BankAccount();
        var tasks = new Task<int>[1000];


        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            tasks[i] = new Task<int>((stateObject)=>
            {
                int isobalance = (int) stateObject;
                for (int j = 0; j < 1000; j++)
                {
                    isobalance ++;
                }
                return isobalance;
             }, account.Balance);

             tasks[i].Start();
        }
        Task.WaitAll(tasks);

        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            account.Balance += tasks[i].Result;
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Epectecd valeu {0}, Counter value {1}",1000000,account.Balance);

        // wait for input before exiting
        Console.WriteLine("Press enter to finish");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The method that you have passed to the Task constructor does not update account.Balance it only uses the initial value of account.Balance. It does not update it. int is pass by value. From MSDN:

A value-type variable contains its data directly as opposed to a reference-type variable, which contains a reference to its data. Therefore, passing a value-type variable to a method means passing a copy of the variable to the method. Any changes to the parameter that take place inside the method have no affect on the original data stored in the variable. If you want the called method to change the value of the parameter, you have to pass it by reference, using the ref or out keyword. For simplicity, the following examples use ref.

Therefore account.Balance is not updated until after Task.WaitAll(tasks); is called. Task.WaitAll() causes the code to stop there until all tasks have finished. Only after that, once all the results have been computed. will account.Balance be updated with the values returned from tasks[i].Result.

share|improve this answer
    
So the key to it is that the Task.WaitAll(tasks) as all tasks are assigned account.Balance by value and because all tasks are forced to finish the org balance will always be 0 when assigning account.balance :-) –  HoopSnake Dec 5 '11 at 20:29

It does not cause a race condition because you only copy the current value of account.Balance and assign it to a local variable inside the thread. Upon creation of each thread, they simply copy the current value of account.Balance on their stack and then to a local variable, but no thread actually changes it, they all work on their local copy. Imagine this to be like a method call. When you pass an int to a method, it is copied by value and then even if you modify it inside the method you will not see any changes outside.

Having said this, my favorite example to illustrate what you are asking is the very common "assign a unique id to each thread" problem. Consider these two cases:

Not thread-safe:

for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) 
{
    Thread t = new Thread(
       o =>
       {
           int index = i;
           // do whatever
       });
    t.Start();
}

This is not thread-safe because the main thread continues to loop over i while the threads are using it inside their code. When each thread t actually starts, i may have already reached n.

Thread-safe:

for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) 
{
    Thread t = new Thread(
       o =>
       {
           int index = (int)o;
           // do whatever
       });
    t.Start(i);
}

This is thread-safe given my initial explanation. Each thread receives the current value of i upon creation and copies it inside a local variable, such that the threads will correctly have ids 0, 1, ..., n-1. I hope this example makes it more clear.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.