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i'm looking for an implementation of SortedSet with a limited number of elements. So if there are more elements added then the specified Maximum the comparator decides if to add the item and remove the last one from the Set.

SortedSet<Integer> t1 = new LimitedSet<Integer>(3);
t1.add(5);
t1.add(3);
t1.add(1);
// [1,3,5]
t1.add(2);
// [1,2,3]
t1.add(9);
// [1,2,3]
t1.add(0);
// [0,1,2]

Is there an elegant way in the standard API to accomplish this?

I've wrote a JUnit Test for checking implementations:

@Test
public void testLimitedSortedSet() {
final LimitedSortedSet<Integer> t1 = new LimitedSortedSet<Integer>(3);
t1.add(5);
t1.add(3);
t1.add(1);
System.out.println(t1);
// [1,3,5]
t1.add(2);
System.out.println(t1);
// [1,2,3]
t1.add(9);
System.out.println(t1);
// [1,2,3]
t1.add(0);
System.out.println(t1);
// [0,1,2]
Assert.assertTrue(3 == t1.size());
Assert.assertEquals(Integer.valueOf(0), t1.first());
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

With the standard API you'd have to do it yourself, i.e. extend one of the sorted set classes and add the logic you want to the add() and addAll() methods. Shouldn't be too hard.

Btw, I don't fully understand your example:

t1.add(9);
// [1,2,3]

Shouldn't the set contain [1,2,9] afterwards?

Edit: I think now I understand: you want to only keep the smallest 3 elements that were added to the set, right?

Edit 2: An example implementation (not optimised) could look like this:

class LimitedSortedSet<E> extends TreeSet<E> {

  private int maxSize;

  LimitedSortedSet( int maxSize ) {
    this.maxSize = maxSize;
  }

  @Override
  public boolean addAll( Collection<? extends E> c ) {
    boolean added = super.addAll( c );        
    if( size() > maxSize ) {
      E firstToRemove = (E)toArray( )[maxSize];
      removeAll( tailSet( firstToRemove ) );
    }   
    return added;
  }

  @Override
  public boolean add( E o ) {    
    boolean added =  super.add( o );
    if( size() > maxSize ) {
      E firstToRemove = (E)toArray( )[maxSize];
      removeAll( tailSet( firstToRemove ) );
    }
    return added;
  }
}

Note that tailSet() returns the subset including the parameter (if in the set). This means that if you can't calculate the next higher value (doesn't need to be in the set) you'll have to readd that element. This is done in the code above.

If you can calculate the next value, e.g. if you have a set of integers, doing something tailSet( lastElement + 1 ) would be sufficient and you'd not have to readd the last element.

Alternatively you can iterate over the set yourself and remove all elements that follow the last you want to keep.

Another alternative, although that might be more work, would be to check the size before inserting an element and remove accordingly.

Update: as msandiford correctly pointed out, the first element that should be removed is the one at index maxSize. Thus there's no need to readd (re-add?) the last wanted element.

Important note: As @DieterDP correctly pointed out, the implementation above violates the Collection#add() api contract which states that if a collection refuses to add an element for any reason other than it being a duplicate an excpetion must be thrown.

In the example above the element is first added but might be removed again due to size constraints or other elements might be removed, so this violates the contract.

To fix that you might want to change add() and addAll() to throw exceptions in those cases (or maybe in any case in order to make them unusable) and provide alterante methods to add elements which don't violate any existing api contract.

In any case the above example should be used with care since using it with code that isn't aware of the violations might result in unwanted and hard to debug errors.

share|improve this answer
    
you are right. If the sort order would be irrelevant , i could use a queue for the task. –  Andreas Dec 5 '11 at 8:23
    
Thx for you example! I've wrote a unit test and it failed: void testLimitedSortedSet() { final LimitedSortedSet<Integer> t1 = new LimitedSortedSet<Integer>(3); t1.add(5); t1.add(3); t1.add(1); System.out.println(t1); // [1,3,5] t1.add(2); System.out.println(t1); // [1,2,3] t1.add(9); System.out.println(t1); // [1,2,3] t1.add(0); System.out.println(t1); // [0,1,2] Assert.assertTrue(3 == t1.size()); Assert.assertEquals(Integer.valueOf(0), t1.first()); } –  Andreas Dec 5 '11 at 8:47
    
Thx for you example! I've wrote a unit test and it failed with the following output: [1, 3, 5]. Like I mentioned to @Kowser 's answer, I'll try to use NavigableSet. When i'm finished, i post the code here. For your efforts I mark your code as solution. –  Andreas Dec 5 '11 at 8:54
    
@Andreas note that I fixed some errors in my code (I had headSet() instead of tailSet() and needed to "readd" the last element). Also please note that this is just an example for you to build on and you'd still need to check for bugs and fix them. –  Thomas Dec 5 '11 at 8:57
1  
I'm aware of the example status of your code. I don't want you to do my 'homework' :-) I'm already in the debugging process and maybe I pick up the idea of Sean Patrick Floyd with the decorator pattern. –  Andreas Dec 5 '11 at 9:10

I'd say this is a typical application for the decorator pattern, similar to the decorator collections exposed by the Collections class: unmodifiableXXX, synchronizedXXX, singletonXXX etc. I would take Guava's ForwardingSortedSet as base class, and write a class that decorates an existing SortedSet with your required functionality, something like this:

public final class SortedSets {

    public <T> SortedSet<T> maximumSize(
        final SortedSet<T> original, final int maximumSize){

        return new ForwardingSortedSet<T>() {

            @Override
            protected SortedSet<T> delegate() {
                return original;
            }

            @Override
            public boolean add(final T e) {
                if(original.size()<maximumSize){
                    return original.add(e);
                }else return false;
            }

            // implement other methods accordingly
        };
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Good idea! When i have to implement more than one 'special' Set I'll use it. –  Andreas Dec 5 '11 at 9:26
    
Your current code violates the Collection#add contract, which explicitly states you can't simply return false when refusing an element. It would be better to define an offer method instead. –  DieterDP Jul 3 '14 at 7:45
    
@DieterDP I don't know. I would argue that the "If a collection refuses to add a particular element for any reason other than that it already contains the element" clause is similar enough to this use case. I would certainly refrain from introducing a method that's not backed by an interface. So perhaps one could also write a LimitedSortedSet interface that extends SortedSet with this method. But given the scope of a SO answer I chose not to go full circle –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jul 3 '14 at 9:03

No, there is nothing like that using existing Java Library.

But yes, you can build a one like below using composition. I believe it will be easy.

public class LimitedSet implements SortedSet {

    private TreeSet treeSet = new TreeSet();

    public boolean add(E e) {
        boolean result = treeSet.add(e);
        if(treeSet.size() >= expectedSize) {
            // remove the one you like ;)
        }
        return result;
    }

    // all other methods delegate to the "treeSet"

}

UPDATE After reading your comment

As you need to remove the last element always:

  • you can consider maintaining a stack internally
  • it will increase memory complexity with O(n)
  • but possible to retrieve the last element with just O(1)... constant time

It should do the trick I believe

share|improve this answer
    
I thought of this. But i hoped there were an efficient implementation out there :-). Removing the last element in a TreeSet could be costly, because the whole list has to be traversed. For Java 1.6 i could use NavigableSet, there is a pollLast() method which should be fast. –  Andreas Dec 5 '11 at 8:39
    
as you need to remove the last element always, you can consider maintaining a stack internally. it will increase memory complexity with O(n), but possible to retrieve the last element with just O(1)... constant time. It should do the trick I believe. –  Kowser Dec 5 '11 at 9:03
    
though you have already selected an answer, but I am curious what do you think. –  Kowser Dec 5 '11 at 9:06
    
I'm not sure what you mean with your internal stack. I thought the TreeSet has a double linked list for storing the elements and remembering the first and last one. So the pollLast() method should not traverse the list at all, because the last element is known. To optimise the add() operation, a precheck can be done, if the element should be added at all. –  Andreas Dec 5 '11 at 9:25

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