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I am calling valueChangeListener on a booleanCheckBox,which is inside a dataTable. and that dataTable is again inside another(outer) dataTable. In the valueChangeListener method I want the instance object of outer dataTable. Is there any way to get the object of outer dataTable instance?Please help!

EX:

  <p:panelGroup id="panelId">
 <p:dataTable id="outerDatatable" var="supplier"
  value="bean.supplierList">  <p:column>
   <f:facet name="header">   
  <h:outputText value="Suppliers" />   </f:facet>  
   <h:outputText
   value="#{supplier.name}" />  </p:column> 
  <p:column> 
   <p:dataTable
   id="innerDataTable" var="supplierAccount"
   value="supplier.supplierAccountList">
   <p:column>
   <h:selectBooleanCheckbox id="booleanBoxId"
   value="#{supplierAccount.supported}"
   valueChangeListener="#bean.checkBoxListener}" immediate="true"    
   onchange="this.form.submit( );"> </h:selectBooleanCheckbox>
   </p:column>

  </p:dataTable> </p:column> </p:dataTable>

  </p:panelGroup>

I found the following solution : I used p:ajax listener instead of valueChangeListener, and I could pass 'supplier' object as well as 'supplierAccount' object to this listener method. We can pass any number of custom objects to P:ajax listener.

        <p:column>
   <h:selectBooleanCheckbox id="booleanBoxId"
   value="#{supplierAccount.supported}"
   immediate="true"> </h:selectBooleanCheckbox>
    <p:ajax listener="#{bean.myListenerMethod(supplier,supplierAccount)}"       
     update=":formName:panelId"/>
   </p:column>
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2 Answers 2

In this particular case, you could get it by evaluating the #{supplier} programmatically:

public void checkBoxListener(ValueChangeEvent event) {
    FacesContext context = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance();
    Supplier supplier = context.getApplication().evaluateExpressionGet(context, "#{supplier}", Supplier.class);
    // ...
}

However, this is plain ugly, you're synchronously submitting the entire form by onchange="submit()". I recommend to throw in some ajax for that.

<h:selectBooleanCheckbox value="#{supplierAccount.supported}">
    <f:ajax listener="#{bean.checkBoxListener}" immediate="true" render="???" />
</h:selectBooleanCheckbox>

(the render attribute is up to you)

with

public void checkBoxListener(AjaxBehavior event) {
    Boolean value = (Boolean) ((UIInput) event.getComponent()).getValue();
    FacesContext context = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance();
    Supplier supplier = context.getApplication().evaluateExpressionGet(context, "#{supplier}", Supplier.class);
    // ...
}

Unrelated to the concrete problem, if you really insist in using onchange="submit()", then it may be useful to know that onchange doesn't work as expected for checkboxes in IE6/7. It get only fired on every 2nd click. You rather want to use onclick="submit()" instead.

share|improve this answer

I see that you forgot a brace ({) just before bean:

valueChangeListener="#{bean.checkBoxListener}" immediate="true" 

Also, since you're using Primefaces, you could use it's components(that if you use version 3): http://www.primefaces.org/showcase-labs/ui/selectBooleanCheckbox.jsf

It isn't necessary to use outputText if you use jsf 2:

<f:facet name="header">   
  Suppliers  
</f:facet>   

Also it isn't necessary to use f:facet because the column component has an attribute called headerText:

<p:column headerText="Suppliers">
    #{supplier.name}"
</p:column>

It's a lot simpler that way, isn't it?

PS: What's this? value="supplier.supplierAccountList" No #{ }?

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for replying.. i newly heard about attribute 'headerText', but i'll have to use <facet>n e ways as its common format used in my project. About value="supplier.supplierAccountList" , its value="#{supplier.supplierAccountList}" only in my code. missed the braces while copying the code here. –  Amruta Dec 5 '11 at 9:26
    
@amruta dialogues like "thanks for ..", "hello .." etc formalities are not received well. infact they are considered spammy. –  Wildling Dec 15 '11 at 10:09
    
@drunkMonk Let the man thank :) At least hello is indeed spam –  spauny Dec 15 '11 at 11:01

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