Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for a regex to match hyphenated words in python.

The closest I've managed to get is: '\w+-\w+[-w+]*'

text = "one-hundered-and-three- some text foo-bar some--text"
hyphenated = re.findall(r'\w+-\w+[-\w+]*',text)

which returns list ['one-hundered-and-three-', 'foo-bar'].

This is almost perfect except for the trailing hyphen after 'three'. I only want the additional hyphen if followed by a 'word'. i.e. instead of the '[-\w+]*' I need something like '(-\w+)*' which I thought would work, but doesn't (it returns ['-three, '']). i.e. something that matches |word followed by hyphen followed by word followed by hyphen_word zero or more times|.

share|improve this question
1  
I don't know what you plan to use this for, but have you considered cases where a trailing or prefixed hyphen is valid, like "nineteenth- and twentieth-century" or "investor-owned and -operated"? –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Dec 5 '11 at 9:38
1  
The main problem in your own expression are the square brackets. They don't group the content together, they create a character class, thats something completely different. –  stema Dec 5 '11 at 9:46
    
Thanks for the input, lazyr. I have considered the cases you point out, and they will not pose a problem. Thanks for the clarification, stema. I realised that the square brackets did not group the content, but they resulted in the closest match for what I was attempting to do. –  Sixhobbits Dec 5 '11 at 11:55
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try this:

re.findall(r'\w+(?:-\w+)+',text)

Here we consider a hyphenated word to be:

  • a number of word chars
  • followed by any number of:
    • a single hyphen
    • followed by word chars
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much! Exactly what I was looking for. Much appreciated. –  Sixhobbits Dec 5 '11 at 11:52
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.