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I have the doubt regarding the for loop execution when i execute the following piece of code

public class LoopTest
{
    public static void main (String... args) {
        int num = 3;
        do {
            for (int index = 3; index-- > 1;)
                System.out.print("index value:" + index + "\n");
            System.out.print("num:" + num + "\n");
        } while (num-- > 1);
        System.out.print("num:" + num + "\n");
    }
}

OUTPUT:

index value:2
index value:1
num:3
index value:2
index value:1
num:2
index value:2
index value:1
num:1
num:0

I completely don't understand how the value of index is 2 instead of 3,also 1 get printed inspite of the condition in the for loop "index-- > 1" Expecting reply as soon as possible

Thanks in advance, Nusrath.

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Don't do that inlining magic, there is no case in real life where it could be useful in any way. –  Max Dec 5 '11 at 9:39
1  
Just a comment, indenting your code correctly helps a lot when you're trying to understand it. –  Matthew Farwell Dec 5 '11 at 9:41
    
Using a debugger to step through each line of code is a good way to "completely" understand what each line of code is doing. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 5 '11 at 10:00

4 Answers 4

1) You're decrementing index part of the condition, which executes before even the first iteration. That's why you're seeing index=2 in the first iteration.

2) You're using the postfix-decrement in the condition, which means "decrement, but the result of the expression is the original value" which is why you're seeing index=1 - when index is 2, the condition is met but index is decremented to 1.

Basically, it would be a lot cleaner if this were written as:

for (int index = 3; index > 1; index--)

I'd also suggest you make a similar change to your

while (num-- > 1)

loop. Basically, mixing side-effecting operators and conditions is almost always a bad idea. It generally makes the code much harder to read and understand - as this question basically proves.

Additionally, it definitely helps if you use braces for every for loop. So instead of this:

for (int index = 3; index-- > 1;)
    System.out.print("index value:" + index + "\n");

Write this:

for (int index = 3; index > 1; index--) {
    System.out.print("index value:" + index + "\n");
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Actually, sometimes I just want to give a +10 for an answer... –  nfechner Dec 5 '11 at 9:50

I completely don't understand how the value of index is 2 instead of 3

This is the order of execution for iterations where the condition passes:

index = 3;
index--;
System.out.print("index value:" + index + "\n");
index--;
System.out.print("index value:" + index + "\n");

That is why you get index values of 2 and 1.

The reason why you can get an index value of 1 inside of the body of the loop is because in the condition, index-- returns index and then decrements index. Perhaps what you're wanting is:

for (int index = 3; index > 1; index--)

Which will get to the body of the for loop with index values of 3 and 2.

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In a for loop, the condition is executed before each loop, including the first loop. So, the order of execution is:

  1. int index = 3;
  2. index--;
  3. test for index > 1
  4. execute loop
  5. goto 2.

As you can see, at the start of the first loop, index will be 2

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After you compared

index-- > 1

The index is decreased. To solve this just use the default for loop:

for(int index = 3; index > 1; index--)
{
   ... code
}

Hope this solves your problem.

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