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I have a class called WxFrame which creates a wxPython frame. I added a method called createRunButton which receives self and pydepp, which is the object of a PyDEPP class

import wx

class WxFrame(wx.Frame):
    def __init__(self, parent, title):
        super(WxFrame, self).__init__(parent, title=title)
        self.Maximize()
        self.Show()

    def createRunButton(self,pydepp):
        #pydepp.run()
        self.runButton = wx.Button(self, label="Run")
        self.Bind(wx.EVT_BUTTON, pydepp.run, self.runButton

This is the PyDEPP class:

class PyDEPP:
    def run(self):
        print "running"

I instantiate and run it with:

import wx
from gui.gui import WxFrame
from Depp.Depp import PyDEPP

class PyDEPPgui():
    """PyDEPPgui create doc string here ...."""
    def __init__(self,pydepp):
        self.app = wx.App(False)
         ##Create a wxframe and show it
        self.frame = WxFrame(None, "Cyclic Depp Data Collector - Ver. 0.1")
        self.frame.createRunButton(pydepp)
        self.frame.SetStatusText('wxPython GUI successfully initialised')

if __name__=='__main__':
    #Launch the program by calling the PyDEPPgui __init__ constructor
    pydepp = PyDEPP()
    pydeppgui = PyDEPPgui(pydepp)
    pydeppgui.app.MainLoop()

The error I get when running the above code is: TypeError: run() takes exactly 1 argument (2 given)

However, if I comment out the bind and uncomment the line pydepp.run(), then it works fine.

The answer is obvious I'm sure, but I have never studied CompSci or OO coding.

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2 Answers 2

The event gets passed as an argument to the callback function. This should work:

class PyDEPP:
    def run(self, event):
        print "running"
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When the event is triggered two arguments are passed to the callback function run(): the object which has triggered the event, and a wxEvent object. Since run only accepts one argument in your code the interpreter is giving that error which tells you that you've provided too many arguments.

Replace

run(self):  # Expects one argument, but is passed two. TypeError thrown

with

run(self, event): # Expects two arguments, gets two arguments.  All is well

and it should work.

This is one instance where the error tells you a lot about what's wrong with the code. Given that "run() takes exactly 1 argument (2 given)", you immediately know that either you've accidentally passed an extra argument, or run should be expecting another.

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