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I have a following scenario,

void* Refresh(void *)
{
 usleep(10);
 ..
}

static void RefreshViews()
{    ...
     pthread_t t;
     pthread_create( &t, NULL, &Refresh, NULL);
     ...
}

I want to run a thread at the end of RefreshViews() function. For it to work(temp solution) properly, I have added sleep in another thread at the beginning of its execution in Refresh() function.

How can I handle this situation better?

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Create the thread just before leaving the function? –  Joachim Pileborg Dec 5 '11 at 11:03
    
So, you want the other thread to start after a short delay? –  OSH Dec 5 '11 at 11:03
    
Why doesn't it work properly? –  TheJuice Dec 5 '11 at 11:15
    
Not clear to me what you actually want –  hirschhornsalz Dec 5 '11 at 11:15
    
I just want another thread to execute after RefreshViews() has finished executing and control goes back to its caller. –  MacGeek Dec 5 '11 at 11:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are three methods you can use:

  1. Like I said in my comment, start the thread just before you leave the function.

    static void RefreshViews()
    {
        /* The code... */
    
        pthread_t t;
        pthread_create( &t, NULL, &Refresh, NULL);
    }
    
  2. Create the thread in the function calling RefreshViews.

  3. Have an extra function, that acts as a proxy to the real function, and which creates the thread:

    static void RefreshViews()
    {
        RealRefreshViews();
        pthread_t t;
        pthread_create( &t, NULL, &Refresh, NULL);
    }
    

One thing about the first method, is that you have to remember to create the thread if you have an explicit return before the end of the function. Or use goto to go to the thread creation instead of return.

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Define the thraed handle outsite of the static function or make the t static as well. The thread handle in your function will be destroyed as soon as you leave the function and t is poped from the stack. If you don't need any control over the thread (or remove it in a clean way) leave it, as it is.

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