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I'm trying to alter the coloring of something using an unsigned int (0xFF998877 etc...) in the form 0xAABBGGRR where A is Alpha and B, G and R are Blue, Green and Red.

I'm wondering however what the best way would be to alter the color I'm passing in to slowly become darker and or lighter.

As I don't have a lot of experience with unsigned int in this way my solution was simply to decrement the value by 1, but this had weird results. Is there a good method to only alter the RGB elements and keep the Alpha constant? I did, in my scant research, find that I could multiply other unsigned ints together to produce my final result e.g. (0xFF * 0x99 * 0x99 * 0x99) but this still left the alpha value variable in the end result.

Any help is greatly appreciated!

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I think you should read up on bitwise operators if you want to manipulate the value directly as opposed to converting it to HSL and adjust it there (which is probably the best solution). –  LiMuBei Dec 5 '11 at 12:29

2 Answers 2

What you need to do is to convert your color to HSL(or HSV) and then change the lightness (or value) as you desire. Then you need to convert it back to RGB.

There's a huge amount of code on the internet that you can use to do this conversion. If you had trouble with that, I could provide you with some code of my own.

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I know nothing about colour manipulation in C++ but could you not simply use a bitmask? Or write a class that represent a colour using 4 UINT8 (unsigned char)? Then you could easily write all kinds of manipulations of different channels.

It would make for a great API as well:

Colour c(128,50,50,0);
c.saturateRed(10);
c.darkerBySteps(3);
c.desaturateGreen(10);
UINT32 rawColVal = c.getRawValue();
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