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I have a legacy file format which I'm converting into XML for processing. The structure can be summarised as:

<A>
    <A01>X</A01>
    <A02>Y</A02>
    <A03>Z</A03>
</A>

The numerical part of the tags can go from 01 to 99 and there may be gaps. As part of the processing certain records may have additional tags added. After the processing is completed I'm converting the file back to the legacy format by iterwalking the tree. The files are reasonably large (~150,000 nodes).

A problem with this is that some software which uses the legacy format assumes that the tags (or rather fields by the time it's converted) will be in alpha-numeric order but by default new tags will be added to the end of the branch which then causes them to come out of the iterator in the wrong order.

I can use xpath to find the preceeding sibling based on tag name each time I come to add a new tag but my question is whether there's a simpler way to sort the tree at once just prior to export?

Edit:

I think I've over summarised the structure.

A record can contain several levels as described above to give something like:

<X>
    <X01>1</X01>
    <X02>2</X02>
    <X03>3</X03>
    <A>
        <A01>X</A01>
        <A02>Y</A02>
        <A03>Z</A03>
    </A>
    <B>
        <B01>Z</B02>
        <B02>X</B02>
        <B03>C</B03>
    </B>
</X>
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1  
I'm not so sure the XML schema is very well thought through. Aren't A01 and A02 the same type of things? They should share the same element name. The number should perhaps be an attribute, not part of the tag name. Also, the tag names should be more readable than that, of course, but I realize they may just be an example. –  Mark Thomas Dec 5 '11 at 12:42
    
Unfortunately I have no control of the legacy format and this is a direct translation of how it stores the data in key/value pairs. In the original file it might say "A01=Bob" and the applications then know that number holds the forename. –  George Dec 5 '11 at 14:09
    
There are many ways to implement this in XML but the one you've shown here is not a very semantic translation. Your schema would be complicated and ever-changing. I would suggest <item key="A01">value</item> where item is the thing that A01, A02 represents. –  Mark Thomas Dec 5 '11 at 17:40
    
When I say key/value pairs I meant a static list of keys that are known to mean something - so where it says <A01>Bob<A01> what it's actually saying is <Forename>Bob</Forename> but just that the legacy application (~20 years old) was written with these opaque numerical field names. –  George Dec 5 '11 at 18:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's possible to write a helper function to insert a new element in the correct place, but without knowing more about the structure it's difficult to make it generic.

Here's a short example of sorting child elements across the whole document:

from lxml import etree

data = """<X>
    <X03>3</X03>
    <X02>2</X02>
    <A>
        <A02>Y</A02>
        <A01>X</A01>
        <A03>Z</A03>
    </A>
    <X01>1</X01>
    <B>
        <B01>Z</B01>
        <B02>X</B02>
        <B03>C</B03>
    </B>
</X>"""

doc = etree.XML(data,etree.XMLParser(remove_blank_text=True))

for parent in doc.xpath('//*[./*]'): # Search for parent elements
  parent[:] = sorted(parent,key=lambda x: x.tag)

print etree.tostring(doc,pretty_print=True)

Yielding:

<X>
  <A>
    <A01>X</A01>
    <A02>Y</A02>
    <A03>Z</A03>
  </A>
  <B>
    <B01>Z</B01>
    <B02>X</B02>
    <B03>C</B03>
  </B>
  <X01>1</X01>
  <X02>2</X02>
  <X03>3</X03>
</X>
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Thanks - the lamba function does just what I need. –  George Dec 5 '11 at 15:33
    
Thanks... I found these article useful too: wiki.python.org/moin/HowTo/Sorting secnetix.de/olli/Python/lambda_functions.hawk –  Homer6 Jun 7 '12 at 0:23

You can sort you xml elements like this:

from operator import attrgetter
from lxml import etree

root = etree.parse(xmlfile)
children = list(root)
sorted_list = sorted(children, key=attrgetter('tag'))

If this running too slow, you might just sort the tag names and get the node using xpath:

tag_list = [item.tag for item in root]
sorted_taglist = sorted(tag_list)
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