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I am currently learning LINQ, when performing this query:

public static class Linq
       {
           // Returns the given anonymous method as a lambda expression
           public static Expression<Func<Int32, Int32>>
              Expr<T, R>(Expression<Func<Int32, Int32>> f)
           {
               return f;
           }
           // Returns the given anonymous function as a Func delegate
           public static Func<T, R>
                 Func<T, R>(Func<T, R> f)
           {
               return f;
           }

   }

//main Fun

var expr = Linq.Expr((Int32 a, Int32 b) => a + b);
var fun = Linq.Func((int a, int b) => a + b);

I get the following error Linq.Expr<T,R>(System.Linq.Expressions.Expression<System.Func<int,int>>)' cannot be inferred from the usage. Try specifying the type arguments explicitly. error. What am I doing wrong?

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1  
What is the point of the members of your static class Linq here? They are simply returning exactly what is passed to them. –  Andrew Barber Dec 5 '11 at 13:08
    
@AndrewBarber: Not quite true. Try writing the last two lines without these methods. You would need to perform either a cast or explicitly specify the type of the variables. These methods are a shortcut for this. Shortcut as in "shorter to type" :-) –  Daniel Hilgarth Dec 5 '11 at 13:48
    
@DanielHilgarth Well, what I said is true, but I see what you mean - they provide a concrete type for the compiler to know what to do with the var keywords. Makes sense, now. :-) EDIT: What I posted was not complete, and in that sense, not quite true. Yes :) –  Andrew Barber Dec 5 '11 at 13:52
2  
@AndrewBarber: Yes. What I meant with "not quite true" is: They are not only returning what is passed to them, but they are also forcing an implicit conversion from a lambda expression to a strongly typed variable - and this is the real benefit. –  Daniel Hilgarth Dec 5 '11 at 13:54

2 Answers 2

If you want to have two input parameters and one return value, you need to use a Func<T1, T2, TRet>, i.e. one with three parameters.

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I think you want this:

public static class Linq { 
// Returns the given anonymous method as a lambda expression 
public static Expression<Func<T1, T2, R>> 
                    Expr<T1, T2, R>(Expression<Func<T1, T2, R>> f) 
      { 
    return f; 
} 
// Returns the given anonymous function as a Func delegate 
public static Func<T1, T2, R> Func<T1, T2, R>(Func<T1, T2, R> f) 
{ 
    return f; 
}} 

Usage:

var expr = Linq.Expr<int, int, int>((a, b) => a + b);
var fun =  Linq.Func<int, int, int>((a, b) => a + b); 
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