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Being a long-time Java programmer and in recent years a Haskell addict, I am learning Scala now. My question is:

How to program without side-effects in Java ?

i.e. How can I do manually what Scala does for me?

The Scala book from Odersky explains functional concepts in terms of OO-terminology often (e.g. val = final, if = ternary op.).

Is there an accessible guide how to program without side-effects in Java (as few as possible)? I guess one could get many of the known benefits with plain old java and a bit of discipline (e.g. unmodifiable collections, final values, rigid methods that don't modify object/application state).

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It rather depends on what you call a side effect. In terms of doing something which is undocumented, most Java APIs are free of side effects. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 5 '11 at 13:31
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@PeterLawrey : I think the OP meant side effects in the sense of purity. –  Prateek Dec 5 '11 at 13:42
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Some thoughts from Neal Ford on IBM developerWorks: ibm.com/developerworks/views/java/…: –  home Dec 5 '11 at 13:46
    
This blog post might be interesting for you: etorreborre.blogspot.com/2011/12/pragmatic-io.html –  Jesper Nordenberg Dec 5 '11 at 14:48
    
From a concurrency standpoint you can apply actor-based concurrency using a Scala-based solution called Akka, available to many different JVM languages. –  dimitrisli Dec 5 '11 at 15:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

See Functional Java.

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I think that's what I was looking for. Still I would like to have some thumb rules similar to java's "attributes are always private, getters/setters are public" or constants are "public static final Type CAPITALS = ...". I work with a lot of legacy java code and want to reuse my FP-abilities and share them with my collegues. But I see the discussion goes on below :-) –  Bastl Dec 6 '11 at 6:53
  1. Make every method, field, and class either abstract or final.
  2. Make every variable and method parameter final.
  3. If you use mutable structures like Array, or i/o resources like files and database connections, never let them escape the scope in which they are constructed.
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Being a long-time Java programmer and in recent years a Haskell addict, I am learning Scala now.

Congrats :)

How to program without side-effects in Java? i.e. How can I do manually what Scala does for me?

Well, Scala doesn't do all that much for you (when compared to Haskell) in terms of enforcing or assisting a side-effect free style. For example, you always have the option in Scala to use var wherever you please, whereas in Haskell if you want mutable IORef or STRef you need to indicate this to the type system using the appropriate monad.

In other words, though you're asking how to mimic Scala style in Java, the first step to consider is how to mimic Haskell style in Scala, which is of course where Scalaz comes into play.

All that being said, I think you have mostly answered your own question:

I guess one could get many of the known benefits with plain old java and a bit of discipline (e.g. unmodifiable collections, final values, rigid methods that don't modify object/application state).

Discipline is at least half of the story. Simply using final and immutable collections (à la Guava) has all sorts of consequences for what your code ends up looking like. The other half of the story, of course, is what do you do when your program demands side effects (such as I/O)? In Haskell you'd use the IO monad, and in Scala you might opt to use scalaz.effects.IO, but in Java, to be honest, I think that's not a battle worth fighting.

In my opinion, the two most important lines of functional-style code you'll write in any Java program are the following:

import static com.google.common.collect.Iterables.filter;
import static com.google.common.collect.Iterables.transform;

The rest is an exercise for the reader ;)

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What consequences do you mean? "Simply using final and immutable collections (à la Guava) has all sorts of consequences for what your code ends up looking like." –  Bastl Dec 7 '11 at 8:28

One way to do programing without less side effects is to use only immutable classes. You may apply this to your own classes, but you cannot change the standard Java runntime without rewriting from scratch.

Anyway, making Java side effect free, makes no sense because it is an imperative programming language with OO data encapsulation. In other words, side effects makes part of the language and is not evil per-se.

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What makes a class "immutable" ? –  Bastl Dec 5 '11 at 13:53
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@Bastl: e.g. all its attributes are immutable... in Java it's becoming a problem if your attributes are e.g. native arrays. –  home Dec 5 '11 at 14:01
    
@home: what about parameter passing and "actions" like println() ? –  Bastl Dec 5 '11 at 14:06
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@Bastl: Parameter passing: if all parameters are immutable itself it's not an issue. println is not a good example, at least it modifies the underlaying output stream. –  home Dec 5 '11 at 14:10
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@Bastl I think it Odersky himself who said a purely functional program can only generate heat. I/O is intrinsically not functional and that is why it is separated from the regular code in Haskell with monads. A Java object is immutable if it has no fields that can change their references after instantiation and all objects it can reach are immutable. A good example is String. A good way to enforce with collections is Collections.unmodifiableList() et al. –  ArtB Dec 5 '11 at 15:02

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