Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Currently, I have a server to which 2 clients can connect. Both of those two clients have a text file on their HDD which is read by the program as soon as it starts up. This textfile should contain the EXACT same data (it's just plain text) on both clients (which should get validated by the server) or the server may not serve the clients.

I'm wondering how to do this correctly. What should I do? Calculate an hashcode, or use MD5/SHA1/SHA2 for something like this? Should I first read the file and calculate an hashcode on the created objects or calculate the MD5 directly on the file?

Thanks

share|improve this question
2  
Perhaps a CRC32 check? How big are the file contents? You might just compare them byte for byte if small. BTW - what application feature does this provide to the end user? –  Andrew Thompson Dec 5 '11 at 13:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To be really, really sure, you have to transfer the contents of both text files to the server and compare them as strings.

For all practical purposes, you can calculate a hash code and compare that value on the server. Have a look at the FileUtil class in apache commons. It defines a checksumCRC32(File file) method that you can use to compute a checksum for a file. If the checksum is equal for both files, the contents can assumed to be equal. The probability that they are different nonetheless is 1 / 2^32.

share|improve this answer

You can easily compute hash of the file using DigestUtils from Apache Commons. It has nice methods for computing hashes be it MD5 or SHA1. Then just compare the hashes of files for each client.

Also, you should be aware that exact hashes doesn't guarantee for 100% that the files are identical. It would be very rare situation where the files are not identical given their hashes are equal. However, depending on whether this determination is critical in your app, you may have to compare the files byte-by-byte when the hashes are equal to confirm for sure that they have the exact data.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.