Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to understand Code Contracts in a bit more detail. I've got the following contrived example, where I'm trying to assert the invariant of a try/get pattern that if it returns true then the out object is non-null, otherwise if it returns false.

    public static bool TryParseFruit(string maybeFruit, out Fruit fruit)
    {
        Contract.Requires(maybeFruit != null);

        Contract.Ensures((Contract.Result<bool>() && Contract.ValueAtReturn(out fruit) != null) ||
                         (!Contract.Result<bool>() && Contract.ValueAtReturn(out fruit) == null));

        // Elided for brevity
        if (ICanParseIt())
        {
            fruit = SomeNonNullValue;
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            fruit = null;
            return false;
        }
    }

I don't like the duplication inside Contract.Ensures so I wanted to factor out my own method for this.

[Pure]
public static bool Implies(bool a, bool b)
{
   return (a && b) || (!a && !b);
}

Then I changed my invariant in TryParseFruit to

Contract.Ensures(Implies(Contract.Result<bool>(), Contract.ValueAtReturn(out fruit) != null);

But this generates warnings that the "ensures is unproven". If I then perform the inline refactoring on my Implies method then everything is OK again.

Could someone explain to me why this happens? I'm guessing it's because Contract.ValueAtReturn is used magically in some way that means I can't just pass it's result off to another function and expect it to work.

(Update #1)

I think that all of the following Contract.Ensures express the same thing (namely that if the function returns true then fruit is non-null, otherwise fruit is null). Note that I am only using one of these at a time :)

Contract.Ensures(Implies(Contract.Result<bool>(), Contract.ValueAtReturn(out fruit) != null));           
Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<bool>() == (Contract.ValueAtReturn(out fruit) != null));
Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<bool>() ^ (Contract.ValueAtReturn(out fruit) == null));

However, none of the above Contract.Ensures lead to a clean compile of the code below. I want the Code.Contracts to express that fruit.Name cannot be a null reference.

    Fruit fruit;
    while (!TryGetExample.TryParseFruit(ReadLine(), out fruit))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Try again...");
    }

    Console.WriteLine(fruit.Name);

I am only able to get the completely clean compile with code contracts if I use the long winded way of expressing this detailed above. My question is why!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Of course, you can also try Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<bool>() == (Contract.ValueAtReturn(out fruit) != null)); I have a vague recollection that the analyzer prefers == to other operators.

I've had some success tracing these things with Contract.Assert which helps you find out where the hole in the analysis lies. I have also found cases where Contract.Assert allows the analysis to succeed. In other words, you might fix this with a couple of assertions:

public static bool TryParseFruit(string maybeFruit, out Fruit fruit) 
{ 
    Contract.Requires(maybeFruit != null); 

    Contract.Ensures(Implies(Contract.Result<bool>(), Contract.ValueAtReturn(out fruit) != null);

    // Elided for brevity 
    if (ICanParseIt()) 
    { 
        fruit = SomeNonNullValue; 
        Contract.Assert(Implies(Contract.Result<bool>(), Contract.ValueAtReturn(out fruit) != null);
        return true; 
    } 
    else 
    { 
        fruit = null; 
        Contract.Assert(Implies(Contract.Result<bool>(), Contract.ValueAtReturn(out fruit) != null);
        return false; 
    } 
} 

Messy, I know. On the other hand, if any assertion fails, you can look, for example, at other aspects of the logic. For example, you can litter your code with Contract.Assert(SomeNonNullValue != null); to see where the analyzer is losing its certainty about the non-nullness of SomeNonNullValue.

EDIT

If the Assert is unproven, but you know that it should be provable, then you can use that to help isolate the problem. I suspect that the problem (or at least part of it) is your lack of Ensures in the Implies method. Try adding Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<bool>() == (Contract.OldValue(a) == Contract.OldValue(b))); Also, as I again have vague recollections about different handling for different logical operators, try restating the return of that method. For example: return a == b;

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the suggestions. I tried using Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<bool>() == (Contract.ValueAtReturn(out fruit) != null)); but this fails (I've updated the question with a few more details). I was unable to use the Contract.Assert to thin down the error case as all the branches just gave an "assert unproven" message. –  Jeff Foster Dec 6 '11 at 11:40
    
Please see the edited answer. –  phoog Dec 6 '11 at 15:06
    
Thanks for the answer. I rejigged my code to have a single return point (return fruit != null). This seems to help the theorem prover out a bit as now the Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<bool>() == (Contract.ValueAtReturn(out fruit) != null)); style contract now compiles completely cleanly. It seems to me that Code Contracts isn't quite ready for prime-time yet . I'd like to be able to simply annotate the invariants of my methods and have it "just work", but it looks like that might be a bit ambitious for this version at least! –  Jeff Foster Dec 7 '11 at 9:29
    
@JeffFoster yes, the fact that CC is not quite ready for prime time accounts for my unfamiliarity with the system -- I experimented with it quite a bit ... several months ago. I dropped it soon after. My frustration was largely caused by parts of the BCL lacking obvious contracts. For example, methods that decompile to return new Something(... can't return null, but CC doesn't know that per se, and in dozens of cases, the framework authors have not yet added Contract.Ensures... –  phoog Dec 7 '11 at 17:02

First of all, your condition might be compacted without using a custom method:

Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<bool>() ^ (Contract.ValueAtReturn(out fruit) == null));

(Here ^ is XOR operator)

Now about your question. I think it's very hard to say what the reason is unless you know exactly how the static verifier works. There might be hundreds of limits. From my point of view, the Code Contracts verifier somehow stops on methods boundaries. I mean the verifier does not look into the Implies method and doesn't know what it does. Therefore it cannot derive what it returns in each case. And when you inline the method, it gains the ability to check the code completely. But, again, I think nobody outside of the dev team knows exactly.

UPDATE

As it has been figured out in the comments, the XOR operator seems to be unsupported by the current CodeContracts release. Better luck next time...

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the comments. I'm aware of the xor operator, but if I use that the verifier also fails with the same error (despite the fact that xor is logically equivalent to the operator in the question). Perhaps it only considers logical && and || operators? It sounds like I need more details about how the verifier works internally! –  Jeff Foster Dec 5 '11 at 15:06
1  
Note that even if I simplify to have a single return statement, the Code Contracts is unable to process the XOR. –  Jeff Foster Dec 7 '11 at 9:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.