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I have 4 lists

l1 = [('x',20),('y',10),('z',40)]
l2 = [('x',30),('r',90),('z',10),('s',20)]
l3 = [('y',20),('z',40),('x',39)]
l4 = [('s',10),('p',20),('z',20)]

from the above lists I want to get the fifth list as

l_final  = [('x',39),('y',20),('z',40),('r',90),('s',20),('p',20)] 

where all the values in the tuple are maximum i.e. in the l_final list the value in tuple ('x',39) 39 is max value for x related tuple.

Also, I am able to solve it upto 2 lists. But not able to do it for 5 lists. Also suggest any other workaround for this.

I am adding my code upto 2 lists code here

l1 = [('x',142),('y',523),('r',278),('p',5)]
l2 = [('r',156),('y',663),('s',145),('x',867)]

mylist = []
for i in l1:
    flag = False
    for j in l2:
             if i[0]== j[0]:
                flag = True
                max1 = max(i[1],j[1])
                mylist.append((i[0],max1))
    if flag == False:
        mylist.append((i[0],i[1]))
        flag = True


for i in l2:
    flag = False
    for j in mylist:
        if i[0] == j[0]:
            flag = True
    if flag == False:
         mylist.append((i[0],i[1]))
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
l1 = [('x',20),('y',10),('z',40)]
l2 = [('x',30),('r',90),('z',10),('s',20)]
l3 = [('y',20),('z',40),('x',39)]
l4 = [('s',10),('p',20),('z',20)]

d = {}
for k, v in l1+l2+l3+l4:
    d.setdefault(k, []).append(v)

mylist = [(k, max(v)) for k, v in d.items()]

mylist is now: [('p', 20), ('s', 20), ('r', 90), ('y', 20), ('x', 39), ('z', 40)].

If you need it in the order you gave us, change the last line:

mylist = [(k, max(d[k])) for k in 'xyzrsp']

[('x', 39), ('y', 20), ('z', 40), ('r', 90), ('s', 20), ('p', 20)]
share|improve this answer
    
The flexibility to set the output key order is nice. I also don't mind the use of setdefault at all; I feel like many people are too quick to reach for collections.defaultdict. I prefer my basic approach, though. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 5 '11 at 15:12
import collections, itertools

class Minimum(object):
    # simulates negative infinity to some degree
    def __cmp__(self, other):
        return -1

def max_elements(*lists): # no idea how to call it
    values = collections.defaultdict(Minimum)
    for key, value in itertools.chain(*lists):
        values[key] = max(values[key], value)
    return values.items()

l1 = [('x',20),('y',10),('z',40)]
l2 = [('x',30),('r',90),('z',10),('s',20)]
l3 = [('y',20),('z',40),('x',39)]
l4 = [('s',10),('p',20),('z',20)]

print max_elements(l1, l2, l3, l4)
# [('p', 20), ('s', 20), ('r', 90), ('y', 20), ('x', 39), ('z', 40)]
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the use of chain and for the negative infinity. –  Noufal Ibrahim Dec 5 '11 at 14:51
    
Oh heck yeah, this rocks. +1 –  rossipedia Dec 5 '11 at 14:59
1  
You could replace Minimum with a simple lambda: values = collections.defaultdict(lambda : -sys.maxint) –  Paul McGuire Dec 5 '11 at 16:38
    
Paul: Lovely. Much better. –  Noufal Ibrahim Dec 5 '11 at 17:20
1  
@PaulMcGuire: It's not the same. Python integers are arbitrary precision, sys.maxint is only the largest that can be represented without switching away from machine integer. –  Cat Plus Plus Dec 5 '11 at 18:07

Assuming that all the numbers are positive

import collections

l1 = [('x',20),('y',10),('z',40)]
l2 = [('x',30),('r',90),('z',10),('s',20)]
l3 = [('y',20),('z',40),('x',39)]
l4 = [('s',10),('p',20),('z',20)]

d = collections.defaultdict(int)

for k,v in l1 + l2 + l3 + l4:
   if d[k] < v: d[k] = v

result = list(d.iteritems())

result is

[('p', 20), ('s', 20), ('r', 90), ('y', 20), ('x', 39), ('z', 40)]
share|improve this answer
1  
Note that this will fail when all values are negative. –  Cat Plus Plus Dec 5 '11 at 14:51
    
Yup. I added a caveat for that in the answer. Thanks! –  Noufal Ibrahim Dec 5 '11 at 14:52
    
See my lambda proposal on @CatPlusPlus's answer. –  Paul McGuire Dec 5 '11 at 16:41

Just whipped this up. Should do what you want. Try adding a 5th list and running it:

def maxmerge(d1, d2):
    for k in d2.keys():
        if not d1.has_key(k):
            d1[k] = d2[k]
        elif d2[k] > d1[k]:
            d1[k] = d2[k]

def maxtup(*lists):
    r = dict()
    for l in lists:
        maxmerge(r, dict(l))
    return r.items()

l1 = [('x',20),('y',10),('z',40)]
l2 = [('x',30),('r',90),('z',10),('s',20)]
l3 = [('y',20),('z',40),('x',39)]
l4 = [('s',10),('p',20),('z',20)]
print maxtup(l1,l2,l3,l4)
share|improve this answer

Assuming the order of the final list doesn't matter.

From the documentation for the built-in dict type:

dict(seq) -> new dictionary initialized as if via:
    d = {}
    for k, v in seq:
        d[k] = v

Thus, if we initialize with multiple equal keys, the last one in the seq will take precedence.

We can exploit that by joining our lists into one, sorting it in increasing order of the numeric values, and then building the dictionary.

Thus, the whole thing is a very short one-liner:

dict(sorted(l1+l2+l3+l4, key=lambda x:x[1])).items()

(Or if you prefer, use operator.itemgetter to implement the key.)

share|improve this answer
    
Nice trick but it's not very readable. The last on in the sequence bit is an implementation detail and would most probably require people to read up on the dict constructor semantics to do understand it.. –  Noufal Ibrahim Dec 5 '11 at 17:23

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