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Why do you want to declare a function non-virtual in a inheritance hierarchy with more than two levels? Can someone please giv me an example?

I know what the difference is and what happens, but I can't really grasp why and when you want to do it.

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Why do you want to declare it virtual? You first. –  Kerrek SB Dec 5 '11 at 15:38
5  
Clearly "I know what the difference is and what happens" and "I can't really grasp why and when you want to do it" are mutually exclusive. –  Polynomial Dec 5 '11 at 15:39
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Erm, whenever you don't want the behavior of said method to change in subclasses. –  Billy ONeal Dec 5 '11 at 15:39
    
The short answer is when you don't want derived classes to replace the implementation of that method. –  AJG85 Dec 5 '11 at 15:41
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5 Answers

From a semantic point of view: So that it can't be overriden.

From a practical point of view: If there are no virtual functions, then there is no need for a vptr, so each instance will occupy slightly less memory. Also, as @Billy says in a comment, it means that the member function won't be called indirectly.

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Plus the cost of indirect calls. Though there are better reasons (in terms of design) which might dictate a method be virtual. –  Billy ONeal Dec 5 '11 at 15:41
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The main reason for this is that when you make a method virtual, you are telling subclasses "go ahead and modify behavior here." When you do this, you limit ability for the base class to be changed. Basically, it's then easy for subclasses to end up depending on implementation details of the base class, and when one tries to change the base class, break an unknowably large amount of code.

Classes need to be designed to be inherited from, and take steps to future proof themselves in their design. You don't want to take such effort and consideration against methods for which there is no variation between subclasses.

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The first question is why you would want an inheritance hierarchy of more than two levels? The most frequent inheritance hierarchy would certainly be an abstract base class and a single level of classes which derive from it. (At least when derivation is being used to implement OO inheritance—it's not rare for C++ derivation to be used for other things.)

There are two frequent patterns where a deeper inheritance hierarchy does occur. The first occurs when you extend an interface; in practice, there's not much difference between this and deriving from a single abstract base, and it would be an error to derive from the class providing the implementation anyway. The second is where the implementation is customizable using the template method pattern. And in this case, you really would like to render the implementation functions in it final: anyone inheriting from this class should only implement the new virtual functions used to define the customization; otherwise, you probably can't guarantee all of the necessary invariants.

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You want to prevent derived classes from overriding it, because...

  1. Virtual functions expose parts of your class to the derived class that you might not want exposed - if a derived class overrides this, changing how and when the function is called might break the derived class.
  2. Performance / inlining. A virtual getter function in a base class is bad if things get really performance critical.
  3. You are calling the function from your (base class) constructor, so overriding the function is pointless. (When called from the base class constructor, the base class version of the function will always be invoked).
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/* we consider why there is no need to declare all functions in multilevel inheritance as virtual,because there are some functions/actions that has to be
performed by only BASE CLASS. hope you understand by this simple example here Parent can see there children Report card and can sign on it. while Big_brother can only read report but cant sign, similarly small_brother also cant sign but can read it; */

#include<cstring>
#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class parent
{
private:
    int signeture;
protected:
    int read;
public:
    parent():read(0),signeture(0){}
    void sign()
    {
    signeture=1;
    cout<<"\nparent sign";
    }
    virtual void readReport()
    {
    cout<<"\nDAD can also read"<<read;
    }
};


class big_brother:public parent
{
public:
void readReport()
{
    read=3;
    cout<<"\nbig brother card"<<read;
}
//some other function which only Big_brother can performed are 
//declared here asnon_virtual

};



class small_brother:public big_brother
{
public:
void readReport()
{
    read=4;
    cout<<"\n small brothers card"<<read;

}
};
int main()
{
parent x;
big_brother y;
small_brother z;
x.readReport();
y.readReport();
z.readReport();
cout<<"only parent can sign";
x.sign();

return 0;
}
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