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I want to be able to call a function within an if statement.

For example:

var photo = "yes";

if (photo=="yes") {

    capturePhoto();

}

else {
  //do nothing
}; 

This does nothing though. The function is clearly defined above this if statement.

Edit: Wow, downboated to hell! capturePhoto(); was just an example function that didn't really need any more explanation in this scenario?

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2  
What do you mean by "does nothing"? Does the function not get called or does it not do what you're expecting it to? What is the function -supposed- to do (posting the code would be useful!) that it doesn't? –  Anthony Grist Dec 5 '11 at 15:54
4  
And what does capturePhoto() do? Unless your JS/browser install is totally hosed, or either of those yes strings are ninjas pretending to be yesses, there's no way that this code could NOT call capturePhoto. –  Marc B Dec 5 '11 at 15:54
2  
A side note: you might want to use true/false boolean constants rather than "yes"/"no" strings. You could then format your if as if (photo) capturePhoto();. –  Xion Dec 5 '11 at 15:55
8  
Why do people ask for help with their code, but then don't provide the code? –  RightSaidFred Dec 5 '11 at 15:56
3  
I can't update RightSaidFred's comment enough. POST YOUR DAMN CODE PEOPLE! –  Polynomial Dec 5 '11 at 15:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

That should work. Maybe capturePhoto() has a bug? Insert an alert() or console.log():

if ( photo=="yes" )
{
  alert("Thank you StackOverflow, you're a very big gift for all programmers!");
  capturePhoto();
}
else
{
  alert("StackOverflow.com must help me!");
}
share|improve this answer
    
It shouldn't be written 'It works!' it should be written - 'thank you StackOverflow!' ! –  Aleks Mar 26 '13 at 14:48
    
@Aleks Why should the code thank StackOverflow if we haven't done anything except saying that capturePhoto() could have a bug? BTW this is more than a year old ;) –  ComFreek Mar 26 '13 at 14:52
1  
Because javascript doesn't report errors like we would want :) And even it is old more then a year, mentioning a word - bug stopped me for a second, and I figured a solution for my similar javascript problem not running a function. Even it is a year old I had to say it helped me +1 ;) –  Aleks Mar 26 '13 at 15:14
1  
@Aleks I'm glad that I could point you in the right direction :) Thank you, thank StackOverflow (see edit)! ;) –  ComFreek Mar 26 '13 at 15:24
1  
hehe :D it is absolutely true!! ;) thanks, have a happy programming ;) –  Aleks Mar 26 '13 at 15:34

You probably missed something, a quotation, a semicolon or something like that. I would recommend you to use a debugger like Firebug or even Google Chrome's Web Developer Tool. You will know what's wrong with your code and where it is wrong.

You may take a look at this live code that your code above works: http://jsfiddle.net/ZHbqK/

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The code looks fine to me (except you don't need the ; at the end of the last line). Check your error log; perhaps the browser thinks capturePhoto is not defined for some reason. You can also add alert statements to make sure the code is actually running:

var photo = "yes";

alert('Entering if statement');

if (photo=="yes") {
    alert('then');
    capturePhoto();
} else {
    alert('else');
    //do nothing
}

When you encounter a situation where it seems like a fundamental language feature is not working, get some more information about what is going on. It is almost never the platform's fault. It is occasionally a misunderstanding of how the feature works (e.g. why does parseInt('031') == 25 ?). It is usually a violation of an assumption you're making about the code that isn't holding up because of a problem elsewhere.

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I'm not seeing any problems here. I used this code and the function call worked. I kept your code and just added a function called capturePhoto().

Are you sure that the code you're using to call the function is firing?

var photo = "yes"; 
if (photo=="yes") 
{ 
    capturePhoto(); 
} 
else 
{ 
    //do nothing 
};
function capturePhoto() 
{ 
    alert("Pop up Message"); 
}
share|improve this answer

The code that you posted does work.

I copied it and tested it.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/Guffa/vraPQ/

The only thing wrong with it that I can see is a semicolon after the closing bracket, but that is only a style problem. It will form an extra empty statement, but that doesn't cause any problems.

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