Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have the following Python code:

if conditionOne():
    if conditionTwo():
        foo = bar
        foo += 1
        bar -= 2

If I later remove conditionTwo, I would like to dedent the three lines of the block so it looks consistent with all my other code. Normally I'd just reach for =% (my primary language is C++), but that won't work here, so I tried 3== on the first line of the block. That led to this:

if conditionOne():
    foo = bar
        foo += 1
        bar -= 2

That's not what I was looking for. I could have gone with 3<< and gotten a better result, but that's not a command I normally use. I'd rather not have to remember special indentation commands just for Python. In the spirit of Don't Make Me Think, is there a way to make the = filters work with Python code as I expect?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of .vimrc configuration for Python –  sehe Dec 5 '11 at 16:41
1  
@sehe, I don't think that's a duplicate of this question, unless there's some setting buried in there that will solve my problem. I'm otherwise happy with the stock Python indenting that comes with Vim 7. –  Michael Kristofik Dec 5 '11 at 16:45
    
you're right sorry about my misunderstanding. No way to remove my vote I'm afraid. I'll see if I can get a moderator in –  sehe Dec 5 '11 at 16:46
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Whereas in C or C++ indenting a program does not affect its behaviour, in Python it could really, since indentation is part of the flow control.

Therefore in Python a program with a different indentation will have a different behaviour and for an editor it is impossible to guess whether the developer wanted to indent a line (in an inner scope) or not.

Hence auto-indenting features of your editor are designed to work with C-like languages, not Python.

share|improve this answer
    
But in this case I don't think it should be impossible to guess correctly. We know two things: (1) I had those three lines indented together, so they probably should stay together. (2) It was smart enough to put the first line one shiftwidth in from the if-statement. Given those two, I think what I want (all three lines indented by one shiftwidth) ought to be possible, I just don't know how. –  Michael Kristofik Dec 5 '11 at 17:25
    
This is completely correct. @Kristo (1) there is no probably. Either it is or it is not. Vim can't guess what exactly you want to do. Think on the opposite case: you added an if. And now, are the subsequent lines all part of the if body? (2) That's because after the if statement what comes is probably its body, which is indented by default. –  sidyll Dec 5 '11 at 18:32
1  
Vim can guess using whatever rules are encoded in the python.vim indentation file in /indent directory. I'm not sure, but one rule could be that a successor line is never to be indented more than one level from preceding line, which (I think?) is a general rule in Python code. (Of course, successor lines could be de-dented any number of levels from preceding lines, but that's different issue.) –  Herbert Sitz Dec 5 '11 at 20:57
add comment

If you use the vim-indent-object plugin, you could do the following to delete the line and dedent the block:

  • With the cursor on the conditional: <iidd
  • With the cursor anywhere in the block: <aidd

With this in mind, maybe you could :nmap =% <ii and :nmap == <ai and delete the conditional as you wish. This isn't a perfect solution but it seems like a decent alternative to me.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.