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Is it possible to have a char primary key on a table? For example 'WC001' then will it automatically increment by 1, so the next record for the pk will be 'WC002' and so on.

Can anyone provide me example?

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Not directly - but you could have a normal INT IDENTITY auto-incrementing numerical ID and then defines a computed persisted column (SQL Server 2005 and newer) - something like:

CREATE TABLE dbo.YourTable
(ID INT IDENTITY(1,1),
 CharID AS 'WC' + RIGHT('000' + CAST(ID AS VARCHAR(3)), 3) PERSISTED,

 CONSTRAINT PK_YourTable PRIMARY KEY(CharID)
)

Inserting values into this table will cause the ID column to be 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ..... and the CharID column will automatically be WC001, WC002, WC003 and so forth.

Since it's a persisted computed column, the values is always up to date, and you can even put an index (like the primary key) on it.

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Not easily, but if you need something like this there's nothing stopping you from breaking up the alpha and numeric portions of your key. Make the WC portion AKey and the numeric be NKey, and auto-inc the Nkey.

If you want you can expose it in a view as:

SELECT AKey + CAST(nkey as varchar) as 'Key'
...

Implementing a "custom" identity never works out well since there are so many factors involved with resolving concurrency issues efficiently.

SQL Server 2012 will add support for more complicated identity fields.

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+1 The important piece is the incrementing integer. The rest is all presentational logic that belongs in an ORM or reporting layer of software (IMHO). –  Yuck Dec 5 '11 at 17:18

My suggestion is to create another column named Id IDENTITY(1,1) INT and then make your desired column as computed column which will consist of Id and formatted number of 0s.

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