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Im working on java, I have created an enum as follows:

public enum myEnum
{
    india,
    russian,
    england,
    north America
}

Above example gives errors while using space in the name of element (i.e. north America). Any suggestions how to resolve above issue?

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1  
Access to this member wouldn't be possible as well; think about myEnum x = myEnum.north America. These won't be compiable because if one would allow such names, where to set the end of an identifier? Maybe the next code line or statement should be included? –  Matten Dec 5 '11 at 17:24
    
Do NOT use small letters for enums and even for class name! –  banterCZ Mar 6 '13 at 7:53
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6 Answers 6

up vote 28 down vote accepted

You can't put a space in the middle of an identifier.

Doing so ends that identifier and the parser assumes whatever comes next is a valid token in that statement's context. There are few (if any) places that would be legal.

Conventional Java value names would be:

INDIA,         // Or  India,
RUSSIA,        //     Russia,
NORTH_AMERICA; //     NorthAmerica;

An enum can have associated properties, like human-readable names, e.g.,

public enum CountryAndOneContinent {

    INDIA("India"),
    RUSSIA("Russia"),
    NORTH_AMERICA("North America");

    private String displayName;

    CountryAndOneContinent(String displayName) {
        this.displayName = displayName;
    }

    public String displayName() { return displayName; }

    // Optionally and/or additionally, toString.
    @Override public String toString() { return displayName; }
}

I'm ambivalent about using toString to provide presentation-layer representations.

I prefer methods communicate their purpose explicitly–it's more expressive and obvious.

toString is pretty generic, and allows only a single representation. Multiple output formats may be required depending on context, parameters, etc. which toString doesn't allow.

Advantages of toString include using default string operations on the object, and in this case, using valueOf to directly translate from the human-readable version to the enum value.

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2  
You might want a different name than name... (Only one element in the OP is a real country. A country, a language, a constituent country and a continent. Quite an enumeration.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 5 '11 at 17:30
1  
+1 for mentioning the issue with toString(). You could ofcourse add a getDisplayName() method instead of using toString(). –  Jesper Dec 5 '11 at 18:29
    
@Jesper Yeah, I suppose for things that look specifically for getXxx--I left it un-JavaBeany. –  Dave Newton Dec 5 '11 at 18:51
    
hahaha!! "and one continent" :'D hilarious. love semantic code :p –  davogotland Dec 5 '11 at 20:55
1  
@davogotland Technically I should have gone with Tom's CountryLanguageFederationContinentEtc but it seemed a bit verbose. –  Dave Newton Dec 5 '11 at 20:57
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I'm gong to go ahead and guess why you want a space in the name; because you want to reference it as a string.

So do this:

public enum MyEnum {
    INDIA("India"),
    RUSSIAN("Russian"),
    ENGLAND("England"),
    NORTH_AMERICA("North America");    

    private String name;

    MyEnum(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return this.name;
    }    
}

You can consider overriding string.

public toString() {
    return name;
}

An advantage of overriding toString() is that this string can also be used in MyEnum .valueOf(myString). So overriding toString basically creates a HashMap of the enum values.

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The problem has nothing (specifically) to do with enums: in Java, names can't have spaces. Try eliminating the space (using capitalization to tell the bits apart) or use underscores instead.

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Write them together like northAmerica or use an underscore north_America.

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Thanks Tudor, but i don't want to do like above as u said. need to keep that words separated. –  BSalunke Dec 5 '11 at 17:19
3  
@BSalunke You can't. You could create an enum with a value, though. See update. –  Dave Newton Dec 5 '11 at 17:19
2  
Just to emphasize what Dave Newton is saying: You can't, it just doesn't work that way. –  Tudor Dec 5 '11 at 17:20
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The Java naming rule does not allow white spaces as possible characters in a name of variables, classes, enums and enum members (and every other identifier). Therefore this "problem" cannot be resolved. Just use `north_america' as member name!

An identifier is an unlimited-length sequence of Java letters and Java digits, the first of which must be a Java letter.

The Java letters include uppercase and lowercase ASCII Latin letters A-Z (\u0041-\u005a), and a-z (\u0061-\u007a), and, for historical reasons, the ASCII underscore (_, or \u005f) and dollar sign ($, or \u0024). The $ character should be used only in mechanically generated source code or, rarely, to access preexisting names on legacy systems.

The "Java digits" include the ASCII digits 0-9 (\u0030-\u0039).

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That's a syntax error, you can write a compilable code without following the convention. –  Bhesh Gurung Dec 5 '11 at 17:23
    
I'm not a native english speaker, but for my understanding it should be called convention :-) –  Matten Dec 5 '11 at 17:26
    
public enum myEnum here he is not following the convention. But north America is a syntax error and it won't compile. –  Bhesh Gurung Dec 5 '11 at 17:27
    
The above section of the java manual describes how to name identifiers with respect to the allowed character –  Matten Dec 5 '11 at 17:30
1  
It's the syntax (rule) which if you don't follow then your code won't compile. Convention is something that's recommended to follow. oracle.com/technetwork/java/codeconv-138413.html –  Bhesh Gurung Dec 5 '11 at 17:34
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public enum myEnum
{
    india,
    russian,
    england,
    north_america
}

To access values

myEnum.values()
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Do NOT use small letters for enums and even for class name! –  banterCZ Feb 26 '13 at 15:28
    
@banterCZ sic erat scriptum –  Marc Nuri Mar 5 '13 at 12:09
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