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I have a method:

def deltas_to_board_locations(deltas, x, y)
    board_coords = []
    deltas.each_slice(2) do |slice|
      board_coords << x + slice[0] 
      board_coords << y + slice[1]
    end
    board_coords
  end 

where deltas is an array, and x,y are fixnums.

Is there a way to eliminate the first and last line to make the method more elegant?

Like:

def deltas_to_board_locations(deltas, x, y)
    deltas.each_slice(2) do |slice|
      board_coords << x + slice[0] 
      board_coords << y + slice[1]
    end
  end 
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1  
KISS ⇒ Keep It Simple Stupid… If it works and is understandable, why should you need a more elegant solution? –  Renaud Dec 5 '11 at 17:41
    
@Renaud Fair enough. Context: I've been charged with refactoring my code to remove complexity and duplication. This was part of that overall effort. –  steve_gallagher Dec 5 '11 at 17:56
2  
@steve_gallagher But there's neither duplication nor complexity in that, it's just minorly verbose. My answer is a fairly straight-forward one-liner, but is it "less complex"? –  Dave Newton Dec 5 '11 at 18:00
1  
@Renaud: using the pattern "empty array + loop + push + return array" in a language that supports functional programming is somewhat dubious. A map is two lines shorter and more clear. –  tokland Dec 5 '11 at 18:42
    
@tokland: I tend to use functional programming idioms when I can, so that when it's something else, I immediately think "Ok, I'm doing something non-standard here. Proceed with caution." –  Andrew Grimm Dec 5 '11 at 22:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
deltas.each_slice(2).flat_map { |dx, dy|
  [x + dx, y + dy]
}

The above works for Ruby 1.9 , but I agree with Renaud. The obvious solution is to be preferred, and in this case is faster than mine, too.

Edit: Incorporated @tokland's comments.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I know that readability comes first, still it is good to know how to initialize or return more compactly like your methods do. –  steve_gallagher Dec 5 '11 at 17:59
1  
Some coments: 1) The argument in the block (slice) can be unpacked, 2) The second inject is in fact a flat_map in disguise (and not very efficient because each iteration creates a new array). –  tokland Oct 24 '12 at 7:11
    
Took you 10 months to comment? ;) But I agree. I upvoted your answer back then already. But then, it too creates a new array each iteration. My solution creates two though, so yeah :) –  Dominik Honnef Oct 25 '12 at 2:46
    
@dominikh: I took a while, yeah :-) Just made the comment because it's the selected answer. The flat_map is not important, but the manual argument unpacking hurts a bit... –  tokland Oct 26 '12 at 18:33
    
@tokland You could always edit the answer ;) I don't expect OP to change the accepted answer. –  Dominik Honnef Oct 26 '12 at 18:58
deltas.each_slice(2).flat_map do |dx, dy|
  [x + dx, y + dy]
end
share|improve this answer
1  
Minor note to future readers; assumes 1.9.2+. But +1, it's faster, and arguably more communicative. –  Dave Newton Dec 5 '11 at 19:05
    
(Faster than mine, I meant.) –  Dave Newton Dec 5 '11 at 22:33
deltas.each_with_index.map { |val, idx| val + (idx % 2 == 0 ? x : y )}

Whether or not this is "less complex" depends on the audience.


Reduction of duplication and complexity should focus on macro-behavior rather than micro-refactoring short, already-readable methods.

Will this rewrite lead to a quantifiably easier-to-understand system? Or are there more important, higher-level issues?

Would enhancing app, class, and method documentation be better? Should those docs be in the code, or in a wiki? Would a picture be worth a thousand lines?


Performance comparison vs. @tokland's (his wins by a significant amount). Assuming deltas is a million-element array 1-1m. MRI, Ubuntu, old pokey machine.

My version

deltas.each_with_index.map { |val, idx| val + (idx % 2 == 0 ? x : y )}

Total: 1.764807

 %self     total     self     wait    child    calls  name
100.00      1.76     1.76     0.00     0.00        1  Array#each
  0.00      1.76     0.00     0.00     1.76        1  Global#[No method]
  0.00      1.76     0.00     0.00     1.76        2  Enumerable#each_with_index
  0.00      1.76     0.00     0.00     1.76        1  Enumerable#map
  0.00      1.76     0.00     0.00     1.76        1  Enumerator#each

Better, shorter, more communicative version

deltas.each_slice(2).flat_map { |dx, dy| [x + dx, y + dy] }

Total: 1.236144

 %self     total     self     wait    child    calls  name
100.00      1.24     1.24     0.00     0.00        1  Array#each
  0.00      1.24     0.00     0.00     1.24        1  Global#[No method]
  0.00      1.24     0.00     0.00     1.24        2  Enumerable#each_slice
  0.00      1.24     0.00     0.00     1.24        1  Enumerable#flat_map
  0.00      1.24     0.00     0.00     1.24        1  Enumerator#each

Original version (fastest):

Total: 0.899122

 %self     total     self     wait    child    calls  name
100.00      0.90     0.90     0.00     0.00        1  Array#each
  0.00      0.90     0.00     0.00     0.90        1  Global#[No method]
  0.00      0.90     0.00     0.00     0.90        1  Enumerable#each_slice
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