Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

In the past, there have been several instances where I have tried to run a Python script under CGI or WSGI, only to get the following ambiguous error in my webserver's log:

[error] [client <client>] (2)No such file or directory: exec of '/path/to/web/root/test.py' failed

This happens even with a very simple script, i.e:

#!/usr/bin/python
print "Content-Type: text/html\n\n"

print "Hello, World!"

In the past, I have managed to solve the issue by making sure the file used unix line endings, but out of curiosity, I have the following questions:

  1. To my knowledge, the above error means that the python executable cannot be found; am I correct?
  2. In the case that the python executable cannot be found, why? Does the CRLF endings break the shebang line?
  3. Is there a workaround for this other than converting the format? Is it possible to configure CGI/WSGI in such a way to handle this automatically?

I have verified this specific example with Apache 2.2 on Ubuntu 11.04, running Python 2.6 under CGI.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the case that the python executable cannot be found, why? Does the CRLF endings break the shebang line?

Yup, that's it.

Is there a workaround for this other than converting the format? Is it possible to configure CGI/WSGI in such a way to handle this automatically?

Something that doesn't make you want to puke? I don't think so.

share|improve this answer

Python will be able to handle the CRLF line endings, but Linux/Unix is expecting only LF as the line ending, so an incredible ugly workaround could be (having the ^M as part of the filename):

$ sudo ln -s /usr/bin/python /usr/bin/python^M

Note that you have to escape the ^M from the command line, so in bash it would be ^V^M.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.