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I implemented joined table inheritance as described in question SQLAlchemy Inheritance.

There is the following situation: I would like to have a

  • User which has an emailaddress
  • Alias which assigns an alias - emailaddress to another email address

In order to keep the emailaddress unique, the idea would be to let both classes inherit from Emailaddress using joined table inheritance. The examples implements the following classes:

  • Emailaddress
  • EmailaddressUser(Emailaddress)
  • EmailaddressAlias(Emailaddress)

The inheritance enables the following usage:

u = EmailaddressUser(name="Testuser", emailaddress="testuser@test.com")

=> I don't need to instantiate an Emailaddress beforehand - which facilitates the usage.

Unfortunately the same thing doesn't work for EmailaddressAlias, although the only difference is the second attribute which is a ForeignKey to the same attribute emailaddress. Therefore I need to specify the *inherit_condition*. BUT:

  a = EmailaddressAlias (
      real_emailaddress="testuser@test.com",
      alias_emailaddress="tu@test.com"
      )

--> Throws an IntegrityError when adding it to the database. See the full example here:

import sqlalchemy as sa
import sqlalchemy.orm as orm
from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base

Base = declarative_base()

class Emailaddress(Base):
  __tablename__ = 'emailaddresses'
  emailaddress = sa.Column(sa.String, primary_key=True)
  emailtype = sa.Column(sa.String, nullable=False)
  __mapper_args__ = {'polymorphic_on': emailtype}


class EmailaddressUser(Emailaddress):
  __tablename__ = 'emailaddress_users'
  __mapper_args__ = {'polymorphic_identity': 'user'}
  emailaddress = sa.Column(
      sa.String,
      sa.ForeignKey('emailaddresses.emailaddress'),
      primary_key=True)
  name = sa.Column(sa.String, nullable=False)


class EmailaddressAlias(Emailaddress):
  __tablename__ = 'emailaddresses_alias'
  alias_emailaddress = sa.Column(
      sa.String,
      sa.ForeignKey('emailaddresses.emailaddress'),
      primary_key=True)
  real_emailaddress = sa.Column(
      sa.ForeignKey('emailaddresses.emailaddress'),
      nullable=False)
  __mapper_args__ = {
      'polymorphic_identity': 'alias',
      'inherit_condition':Emailaddress.emailaddress==alias_emailaddress}


if __name__ == '__main__':
  engine = sa.create_engine ('sqlite:///email.sqlite', echo=True)
  Base.metadata.bind = engine
  Base.metadata.create_all ()
  Session = orm.sessionmaker (engine)
  session = Session ()
  # add user (works):
  u = EmailaddressUser(name="Testuser", emailaddress="testuser@test.com")
  session.add(u)
  session.commit()
  # --> INSERT INTO emailaddresses (emailaddress, emailtype) VALUES (?, ?)
  # --> ('testuser@test.com', 'user')
  # 'emailaddress' is inserted correctly

  # add alias (throws an IntegrityError):
  a = EmailaddressAlias (
      real_emailaddress="testuser@test.com",
      alias_emailaddress="tu@test.com"
      )
  session.add(a)
  session.commit()
  # --> INSERT INTO emailaddresses (emailtype) VALUES (?)' ('alias',)
  # 'emailaddress' is missing! => IntegrityError
share|improve this question
    
EmailaddressAlias has 4 properties, including emailaddress and name inherited from Emailaddress, which you don't pass to constructor of new object. So the exception is expected here. I believe inheriting of EmailaddressAlias from Emailaddress is a mistake. Try to describe your intention to get better help. – Denis Otkidach Dec 6 '11 at 10:12
    
I added some words in order to clarify my intention. Concening your comment: name is not inherited from Emailaddress. It is just an attribute from EmailaddressUser. – Philipp der Rautenberg Dec 6 '11 at 15:34
    
After some testing, I think it is a bug in SQLAlchemy for the following reason: renaming within EmailaddressAlias: alias_emailaddress to emailaddress (also within at inherit_condition) solves the problem. However, inherit_condition should allow different naming! – Philipp der Rautenberg Dec 6 '11 at 15:43
    
Here is a good statemend by zzzeek: sqlalchemy.org/trac/ticket/2344 - Thanks very much! – Philipp der Rautenberg Jan 20 '12 at 12:15

Seems like there might be a problem be that EmailaddressAlias is inheriting from EmailAddress and not from Base.

I'm not an expert on this, nor have I done this through the mapper_args, but I find using relationship() to set up the foreign keys works quite well. For example:

from sqlalchemy.orm import relationship
class EmailaddressAlias(Base):
...
    alias_emailaddress_fk = sa.Column(sa.String, sa.ForeignKey('emailaddresses.emailaddress'))
    alias_emailaddress = relationship(EmailAddress, primaryjoin=alias_emaladdress_fk==EmailAddress.emailaddress)
    real_emailaddress_fk = sa.Column(sa.String, ForeignKey('emailaddresses.emailaddress'))
    real_emailaddress = relationship(EmailAddress,primaryjoin=real_emailaddress_fk==EmailAddress.emailaddress)
share|improve this answer

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