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I am trying to develop an optimization function that will determine which elements in list of doubles when added together will be less than a specified threshold values. The elements can be used multiple times.

For example if my list of elements is

{1,3,7,10}  

and my threshold is 20 I would expect my result to be

1
3
7
10
10, 10
10, 7
10, 7, 3
10,7,1
10,7,1,1
10,7,1,1,1
7,7
7,7,3
7,7,1
7,7,1,1
7,7,1,1,1
...

I expect that the answer to this question will probably be a recursive call and probably could be found in a textbook, but I don't know how to properly phrase the question to find the answer. Help from this group of experts would be appreciated.

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2  
Nitpickers corner: You have a list of integers there... –  Oded Dec 5 '11 at 18:21
2  
Looks like the knapsack problem, or a variation of it... –  Thomas Levesque Dec 5 '11 at 18:46
    
@Thomas Thanks for the link, I suspected that this wasn't the first time someone had run into this problem –  DarwinIcesurfer Dec 5 '11 at 20:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This program works, and seems to be the simplest solution. All results are sorted ascending.

  private static final HashSet<ArrayList<Double>> lists = 
       new HashSet<ArrayList<Double>>(); // all of the combinations generated

  private static final double[] elements = {10, 7, 3, 1};

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    combine(20, new ArrayList<Double>());
    for (ArrayList<Double> set : lists) {
      System.out.println(set);
    }
  }

  private static void combine(final double limit, ArrayList<Double> stack) {
    // iterates through the elements that fit in the threshold
    for (double item : elements) {
      if (item < limit) {
        final ArrayList<Double> nextStack = new ArrayList<Double>(stack);
        nextStack.add(item);
        // a sort is necessary to let the HashSet de-dup properly
        Collections.sort(nextStack);
        lists.add(nextStack);
        combine(limit - item, nextStack);
      }
    }
  }

This type of combinatoric problem, though, generates many results. If you are more concerned with performance than code readability and simplicity, I can optimize further.

c#:

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Run();
    }

    static public void Run()
    {
        Combine(20, new List<Double>());
        foreach (List<Double> set in lists)
        {

            Debug.Print(set.ToString());
        }
    }
    private static HashSet<List<Double>> lists =
        new HashSet<List<Double>>(); // all of the combinations generated

    private static double[] elements = { 10, 7, 3, 1 };

    private static void Combine(double limit, List<Double> stack)
    {
        // iterates through the elements that fit in the threshold
        foreach (double item in elements)
        {
            if (item < limit)
            {
                List<Double> nextStack = new List<Double>(stack);
                nextStack.Add(item);
                // a sort is necessary to let the HashSet de-dup properly
                nextStack.Sort();
                lists.Add(nextStack);
                Combine(limit - item, nextStack);
            }
        }
    }
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This works. I was looking for a c# solution so I converted the Java(?) code to C# and addded it to your answer –  DarwinIcesurfer Dec 6 '11 at 21:06
    
Thanks. I'm afraid I only know Java, although every time I see C# the syntax look more similar. I think I will try to learn some C for high performance projects. –  Fractaly Dec 7 '11 at 4:41

I'm not sure if the Sort() is needed for detecting correctly duplicate entries but this code should work:

    private List<int[]> CombinedElementsInArrayLessThanValue(int[] foo, int value)
    {
        List<int[]> list = new List<int[]>();

        for (int i = 0; i < foo.Length; i++)
        {
            List<int> start = new List<int>();
            start.Add(foo[i]);
            start.Sort();
            int[] clone = start.ToArray();
            if (start.Sum() < value && !list.Contains(clone))
            {
                list.Add(clone);
                CombinedElementsInArrayLessThanValue(foo, value, start, list);
            }
        }
        return list;
    }

    private void CombinedElementsInArrayLessThanValue(int[] foo, int value, List<int> partial, List<int[]> accumulate_result)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < foo.Length; i++)
        {
            List<int> clone = new List<int>(partial);
            clone.Add(foo[i]);
            clone.Sort();
            int[] array = clone.ToArray();
            if (clone.Sum() < value && !accumulate_result.Contains(array))
            {
                accumulate_result.Add(array);
                CombinedElementsInArrayLessThanValue(foo, value, clone, accumulate_result);
            }
        }
    }
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Process one item in the list at a time, and let the recursion handle one item completely in order to shorten the "depth" of the recursion.

public static List<int[]> Combine(int[] elements, int maxValue)
{
    LinkedList<int[]> result = new LinkedList<int[]>();
    List<int> listElements = new List<int>(elements);
    listElements.Sort();
    Combine(listElements.ToArray(), maxValue, new int[0], result);
    return result.ToList();
}

private static void Combine(int[] elements, int maxValue, int[] stack, LinkedList<int[]> result)
{
    if(elements.Length > 0 && maxValue >= elements[0])
    {               
        var newElements = elements.Skip(1).ToArray();
        for (int i = maxValue / elements[0]; i > 0; i--)
        {
            result.AddLast(stack.Concat(Enumerable.Repeat(elements[0], i)).ToArray());  
            Combine(newElements, maxValue - i*elements[0], result.Last(), result);
        }
        Combine(newElements, maxValue, stack, result);
    }
}
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