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introduction

The start is easy: let's say I have a basic controller which uses a Data Access object (inside it uses Entity Framework) to get an entity:

public class SomeController : Controller
{
  private readonly DataAccess dataAccess;

  public SomeController(DataAccess dataAccess)
  {
    this.dataAccess = dataAccess;
  }

  public ActionResult Index(int id)
  {
    var model = new Model();
    model.Customer = this.dataAccess.Get(id);

    return View(model);
  }
}

Problem

Now I would like to execute an asynchronous task inside my data access class, which can run for maybe 5 minutes, maybe longer. I don't want to reuse the injected data access class, because I like to keep one Entity Framework Context per HttpRequest. So I would like to do this:

public class SomeController : Controller
{
  private readonly DataAccess dataAccess;
  private readonly DataAccess dataAccessForAsyncTask;

  public SomeController(DataAccess dataAccess, DataAccess dataAccessForAsyncTask)
  {
    this.dataAccess = dataAccess;
    this.dataAccessForAsyncTask = dataAccessForAsyncTask;
  }

  public ActionResult Index(int id)
  {
    var model = new Model();
    model.Customer = this.dataAccess.Get(id);

    this.dataAccessForAsyncTask.ExecuteAsyncTask();

    return View(model);
  }
}

Problem 2

My data access class is registered with .InstancePerHttpRequest() because I like to keep one Entity Framework Context per HttpRequest.

Question

Is this even possible? Or should I be doing this completely different? If it is possible, how do I accomplish this with Autofac?

Update

Based on the answer of Dennis Palmer I've adjusted my code. My solution is to create a new instance of the service that has to be executed, without using Autofac this time. (Because the task that has to be executed async is very short running, I choose to do it without a queue.)

// This controller just calls a method on my Service Layer. Nothing special.
public class SomeController : Controller
{
  private readonly Service service;

  public SomeController(Service service)
  {
    this.service = service;
  }

  public ActionResult Index(int id)
  {
    var model = new Model();
    model.Customer = this.service.Get(id);

    return View(model);
  }
}

// This is the Service where the magic happens.
Public class Service
{

  private readonly DataAccess dataAccess;

  // This constructor is used if we want to create a new
  // instance without Autofac
  public Service()
  {
    this.dataAccess = new DataAccess();
  } 

  // This constructor is used if we want to let Autofac
  // create a new instance
  public Service(DataAccess dataAccess)
  {
    this.dataAccess = dataAccess;
  }

  public Customer Get(long id)
  {
    // Get the customer in a Synchronous way.
    var customer = dataAccess.Get(id);

    // Now we have to do something Async.
    // Solution: create a new instance by hand, of the
    // class that holds the method we want to call Async.
    var serv = new Service();

    // Execute the call in a async way.
    new Action<long, long>(serv.DoSomething).BeginInvoke(null, null);

    return customer;
  }

  // This is the method we want to execute async.
  public void DoSomething()
  {
    // Do something short or long running.
  }
}
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2 Answers 2

I don't think you need a separate dataAccess instance. Even though your request gets returned right away, the thread that's executing the async code is going to need to stay alive until that code finishes executing. So your one context per request should work just fine.

The View will be returned to the client immediately, but the thread that served that request should continue to run until the async task is completed. If that's not happening, then you should ask a question about how to keep that thread alive long enough for that to occur and someone who knows more about threading and async operations could provide a better answer.

Edit: (in response to comment) So, if the data context is getting disposed, then you've got a threading issue. It won't matter how you instantiate or inject the data context objects, if the thread isn't living long enough for the async tasks to finish running, then they'll get interrupted.

If it's a long running background task, I would consider using a message Queue and implementing a background task that runs on its own process separate from your MVC application. Something like a Worker Role in Windows Azure.

share|improve this answer
    
ok, that would make things a lot easier. –  user369117 Dec 5 '11 at 19:10
    
update: just tried it, but the Entity Framework objectcontext is being disposed. So it's not as easy as it seems. –  user369117 Dec 5 '11 at 19:46

It's all about lifetime scopes. When you use InstancePerHttpRequest, the lifetime scope of all the components Autofac creates is a single Http request. Once it finishes, Autofac disposes all components.

The solution is very easy: if you have an async task that spans for more than a single Http request, then this task determines the lifetime scope of the components it requires. So you just need to begin a new lifetime scope, then use it to resolve all components required for the async task, and dispose the scope when the task completes. The trick is: you need to create a lifetime scope from the root scope otherwise it would be disposed at the end of HTTP request. This can be achieved in many ways.

Assuming that you use MVC3 and following the autofac integration instructions, you can do it this way:

public class App : HttpApplication
{
  public ILifetimeScope RootLifetimeScope { get; private set; }

  protected void Application_Start()
  {
    var builder = new ContainerBuilder();
    builder.RegisterControllers(typeof(MvcApplication).Assembly);
    var container = builder.Build();
    DependencyResolver.SetResolver(new AutofacDependencyResolver(container)); 
    // save the reference to be able to access it later
    this.RootLifetimeScope = container;

    //...
  }
}

public class SomeController : Controller
{
  private readonly Service service;

  public SomeController(Service service)
  {
    this.service = service;
  }

  public ActionResult Index(int id)
  {
    var model = new Model();
    model.Customer = this.service.Get(id);

    return View(model);
  }
}

Public class Service
{

  private readonly DataAccess dataAccess;
  readonly ILifetimeScope _OwnScope;

  public Service(DataAccess dataAccess)
  {
    this.dataAccess = dataAccess;
  }

  public Customer Get(long id)
  {
    // Get the customer in a Synchronous way.
    var customer = dataAccess.Get(id);

    // Now we have to do something Async.
    // Solution: create a separate lifetime scope that survives longer than HTTP request
    Debug.Assert(HttpContext.Current != null)
    var newScope = ((App)HttpContext.Current.ApplicationInstance)
       .RootLifetimeScope.BeginLifetimeScope();

    // DO NOT use using statement or you'll have your original troubles
    try
    {
      var serv = newScope.Resolve<Service>();
      // the serv instance now will have its own DataAccess
      // which will be diposed only when newScope is disposed

      // Execute the call in a async way.
      new Action<long, long>(serv.DoSomething)
        .BeginInvoke(ar => 
          {
            // finish the action if required

            // DO NOT FORGET to dispose the scope, or you'll have a memory leak
            newScope.Dispose();              
          }, null);
    }
    catch
    {
      // dispose the scope only if something goes wrong.
      // if the code succeeds, you need to dipose the scope in the callback
      newScope.Dispose();
      throw;
    }

    return customer;
  }

  // This is the method we want to execute async.
  public void DoSomething()
  {
    // Do something short or long running.
  }
}

I suppose there should be a more elegant way that doesn't use the service locator pattern (i.e. accessing the ApplicationInstance) but uses only dependency injection. But I cannot craft it quickly.

UPDATE

Another option is using owned instances. Here's how to rewrite your original code:

public class SomeController : Controller
{
  private readonly DataAccess dataAccess;
  private readonly Func<Owned<DataAccess>> dataAccessFactory;

  public SomeController(DataAccess dataAccess, Func<Owned<DataAccess>> dataAccessFactory)
  {
    this.dataAccess = dataAccess;
    this.dataAccessFactory = dataAccessFactory;
  }

  public ActionResult Index(int id)
  {
    var model = new Model();
    model.Customer = this.dataAccess.Get(id);

    Owned<DataAccess> dataAccessForAsyncTaskHolder = null;
    try
    {
      dataAccessForAsyncTaskHolder = dataAccessFactory();
      dataAccessForAsyncTaskHolder.Value.ExecuteAsyncTask(() =>
        // you'll need a completion callback
        {
          // finish the task if required

          // dipose the owned instance
          dataAccessForAsyncTaskHolder.Dispose();
        });
    }
    catch
    {
      if (dataAccessForAsyncTaskHolder != null)
        dataAccessForAsyncTaskHolder.Dispose();

      throw;
    }

    return View(model);
  }
}
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