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For example if I have the following Schema (greatly simplified for brevity). How can I search for posts by Tag? I know how to do this if the tag document collection was embedded but I want to keep Tag's in their own collection.

PostSchema = new Schema({
    title: String
    body: String
    tags: [{type: Schema.ObjectId, ref: 'Tag' }]
});

TagSchema = new Schema({
    name: String
});

// Here is what I've tried
Post.find({'tags.name':'javascript'})
    .populate('tags') // Is it necessary to join the collections?
    .run(function(err, posts) {
       console.log('posts: ', posts);
    });
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Shouldn't that be Post.find({'tags.name':'javascript'}) in your code? –  Ricardo Tomasi Dec 6 '11 at 2:09
    
Yes Ricardo. I was trying to trim out the irrelevant stuff put the wrong query in there. Thanks for catching –  Eric Clifford Dec 6 '11 at 6:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is having a Schema for tags the best approach? Something simpler like this should work:

Posts = new Schema({
    title: String
    body: String
    tags: [String]
})

// ...

Posts.find({ tags: { $in: ['javascript'] }, function(err, posts){
    console.log(posts)
})
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In this instance I think your correct. I've since re factored into the more accepted String Array approach.. and used a mapreduced collection outlined here link to get counting and unique tags etc. Having to get out of the relational database mind set. –  Eric Clifford Dec 6 '11 at 6:30

You should be able to use the object.field notation with mongoose to query embedded docs. However, you might need to make sure your embedded doc has all the fields declared as part of the schema in order (in your sample, you query on "comments.name" but PostSchema has no comments field - maybe this is causing the problem?)

I was able to get a proof of concept working like this, which should run successfully as-is:

var mongoose = require('mongoose')
var Schema = mongoose.Schema

mongoose.connect('mongodb://localhost/testjs');


PostSchema = new Schema({
  title: String,
  body: String,
  comments: [],
  tags: [{type: Schema.ObjectId, ref: 'Tag' }]
});

TagSchema = new Schema({
  name: String
});


var Post = mongoose.model('Post', PostSchema);

var mypost = new Post()
mypost.title = "yo"
mypost.body = "asfkjabfkjbsdf"
mypost.comments = [{'name':'javascript', 'text':'sup'}]
mypost.save(
  function(err){
    // Save the post, and then read it back by querying the embedded field
    Post.find({'comments.name':'javascript'},function(err, posts){
      console.log('posts: ', posts);
    });
  }
);
share|improve this answer
    
I apologize my initial code snippet was hella misleading. I've tried your approach before I posted but if your using an embedded array of ObjectId's instead of just an embedded document what you have above doesn't work. –  Eric Clifford Dec 6 '11 at 6:33

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