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I need to declare a field call "version", but am not sure what data type to use.

My "version" is something like "11.04". I am considering "double" as a good candidate.

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11  
I am imagining rounding happening and getting the next version for free :) –  AraK Dec 5 '11 at 19:48
1  
Is this a marketing version or an engineering version? Because some marketing guy will come up with a cute version name instead of numbers, since math is hard :( –  MSalters Dec 6 '11 at 10:00

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

double is probably a bad idea, unless you are planning on using a Knuth-style version converging on an irrational number. What's wrong with an array of int, or a character string?

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Use two ints - one for the major version number and one for the minor one. Alternatively, use a string :) A double doesn't sound like a good candidate because a lot of numbers can't be represented exactly by doubles.

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A double would be a horrible candidate, as floating point numbers are not sufficiently precise.

I would suggest a class with a couple of int members. Just overload a few operators.

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Use an int and let 1000 correspond to version 1.0, simple enough.

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I think I'd use an array<unsigned char, 4> or so. This allows for things like 11.2.1.3, if you ever end up needing it, and still uses less space than a double. I've yet to see an individual component of a version number exceed 255, soIndividual components of a version number exceeding 255 is sufficiently rare that I doubt that using char for each component will really be a limitation. The obvious exception to that would be if you decide to embed a daily build number into the version number.

If you really want versatility, you could do something like:

typedef unsigned char component_t;

array<component_t, 4> version;

There's just one catch with this: to read it, you need to know what the component_t is. The obvious way to handle that would be to have a one-byte version number telling what version of version number you were using, so anytime you change component_t, (or the number of components allowed) you just increment that! :-)

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@ildjarn: Okay, I've rephrased slightly. –  Jerry Coffin Dec 5 '11 at 20:07

Some libraries use tricks like:

#define PKG_MAJOR (3) // example values...
#define PKG_MINOR (7)
#define PKG_MICRO (11)

const unsigned long pkg_version = (PKG_MAJOR * 1000 + PKG_MINOR) * 1000 + PKG_MICRO;

i.e., pkg_version is 3007011.

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what about using an unsigned int or such? I have just seen this in the linux kernel Makefile

#define KERNEL_VERSION(a,b,c) (((a) << 16) + ((b) << 8) + (c))

You have a kernel version a, a major version b and a minor version c. You can easily compare the order of two versions. If you want to have the version in a nice printable format, you can add a function to make a version string, e.g. "2.6.38". (Of course, you are limited to max. 256 sub-versions... use unsigned long long?)

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I use semantic versioning, and thus I've created the following user-defined type:

version.hpp

#include <string>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

class Version_Number{

public:

    //constructors
    Version_Number(); //<- constructs to 0.0.0
    Version_Number(std::string const& version_number);

    //transformers
    void Major_Update();
    void Minor_Update();
    void Bug_Update();

    //observers
    std::string str();
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Version_Number& r);
    bool operator < (Version_Number const& other) const;
    bool operator > (Version_Number const& other) const;
    bool operator == (Version_Number const& other) const;
    bool operator != (Version_Number const& other) const;

private:
    unsigned int a,b,c;

};

version.cpp

#include <string>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

#include "version_number.hpp"

    Version_Number::Version_Number(): a(0),b(0),c(0){}

    Version_Number::Version_Number(std::string const& folder_name){

        std::string a_str,b_str,c_str;

        auto it = folder_name.begin();
            while (*it != '.'){
                a_str+=*it;
                ++it;
            }
            ++it;
            while (*it != '.'){
                b_str+=*it;
                ++it;
            }
            ++it;
            while (it != folder_name.end()){
                c_str+=*it;
                ++it;
            }

            a = std::atoi(a_str.c_str());
            b = std::atoi(b_str.c_str());
            c = std::atoi(c_str.c_str());
    }

    void Version_Number::Major_Update(){
        ++a;
        b = 0;
        c = 0;
        return;
    }
    void Version_Number::Minor_Update(){
        ++b;
        c = 0;
        return;
    }
    void Version_Number::Bug_Update(){
        ++c;
        return;
    }

    std::string Version_Number::str(){
        std::string str;

        str+= std::to_string(a);
        str+='.';
        str+= std::to_string(b);
        str+='.';
        str+= std::to_string(c);

        return str;
    }
bool Version_Number::operator < (Version_Number const& other) const{
    if (a > other.a){return false;}
    if (a < other.a){return true;}
    if (b > other.b){return false;}
    if (b < other.b){return true;}
    if (c > other.c){return false;}
    if (c < other.c){return true;}
    return false;
}

bool Version_Number::operator > (Version_Number const& other) const{
    if (a < other.a){return false;}
    if (a > other.a){return true;}
    if (b < other.b){return false;}
    if (b > other.b){return true;}
    if (c < other.c){return false;}
    if (c > other.c){return true;}
    return false;
}

bool Version_Number::operator == (Version_Number const& other) const{
    if (a == other.a){
        if (b == other.b){
            if (c == other.c){
                return true;
            }
        }
    }

    return false;
}
bool Version_Number::operator != (Version_Number const& other) const{
    if (a == other.a){
        if (b == other.b){
            if (c == other.c){
                return false;
            }
        }
    }

    return true;
}

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Version_Number& r){
    os << r.a << '.' << r.b << '.' << r.c;
    return os;
}
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