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I have the following class:

public class EmailData
{
    public string FirstName{ set; get; }
    public string LastName { set; get; }
    public string Location{ set; get; }
}

I then did the following but was not working properly:

List<EmailData> lstemail = new List<EmailData>(); 
lstemail.Add("JOhn","Smith","Los Angeles");

I get a message that says no overload for method takes 3 arguments.

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8  
OMG u guys are fast.... –  Dredd Dec 5 '11 at 21:10
7  
I don't really get the downvotes, to be honest. –  Christopher Estep Dec 5 '11 at 21:12
7  
@Morpheus: Someone posts a question. What we see: On your marks, get set, go! –  George Duckett Dec 5 '11 at 21:14
4  
@GeorgeDuckett just when i was about to type the answer i do a refresh pop 5 answers already! –  Dredd Dec 5 '11 at 21:15
4  
@Christopher Estep This is the 3rd question i missed out. I upvoted every answer because everyone responded in a jiffy –  Dredd Dec 5 '11 at 21:18

12 Answers 12

up vote 28 down vote accepted

If you want to instantiate and add in the same line, you'd have to do something like this:

lstemail.Add(new EmailData { FirstName = "JOhn", LastName = "Smith", Location = "Los Angeles" });

or just instantiate the object prior, and add it directly in:

EmailData data = new EmailData();
data.FirstName = "JOhn";
data.LastName = "Smith";
data.Location = "Los Angeles"

lstemail.Add(data);
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How can I read the data from the list once I add some data into the list. Consider I have added three records. –  Random User Jan 16 at 6:44

You need to add an instance of the class:

lstemail.Add(new EmailData { FirstName = "John", LastName = "Smith", Location = "Los Angeles"});

I would recommend adding a constructor to your class, however:

public class EmailData
{
    public EmailData(string firstName, string lastName, string location)
    {
        this.FirstName = firstName;
        this.LastName = lastName;
        this.Location = location;
    }
    public string FirstName{ set; get; }
    public string LastName { set; get; }
    public string Location{ set; get; }
}

This would allow you to write the addition to your list using the constructor:

lstemail.Add(new EmailData("John", "Smith", "Los Angeles"));
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I wouldn't recommend that at all! Why not simply use the Object Initialization syntax!?!?!? Unless you have logic in the constructor, or need to force certain parameters to be set, I wouldn't add a constructor. –  John Bubriski Dec 9 '11 at 17:19
3  
@JohnBubriski It's unlikely that there is a valid meaning for an EmailData class (in this instance) without a name or location. Using a default constructor would allow a user to inadvertently create a class that is in an invalid state. Whenever possible, it's ALWAYS a good idea to force constructors to include all required data to initialize the object into a meaningful state, as this will prevent errors from occurring over time. –  Reed Copsey Dec 9 '11 at 17:27
    
@JohnBubriski Also for the cases where you want to make your objects immutable it's a way to avoid a public setter. –  R0MANARMY Dec 12 '11 at 4:09
    
@R0MANARMY Sure, but that's a specific piece of functionality. –  John Bubriski Dec 13 '11 at 13:19
    
@JohnBubriski Yes, it is. You asked why not use object initialization syntax, Reed and I gave you two reasons. Admittedly his is much better than mine. –  R0MANARMY Dec 13 '11 at 14:26

You need to new up an instance of EmailData and then add that:

var data = new EmailData { FirstName = "John", LastName = "Smith", Location = "LA" };

List<EmailData> listemail = new List<EmailData>();
listemail.Add(data);

If you want to able to do:

listemail.Add("JOhn","Smith","Los Angeles");

you can create your own custom list, by specializing System.Collections.Generic.List and implementing your own Add method, more or less like this:

public class EmailList : List<EmailData>
{
    public void Add(string firstName, string lastName, string location)
    {
        var data = new EmailData 
                   { 
                       FirstName = firstName, 
                       LastName = lastName,
                       Location = location
                   };
        this.Add(data);
    }
}
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The correct way to do it is like this:

listemail.Add(new EmailData(){FirstName = "John", LastName = "Smith", Location = "Los Angeles"});
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You need to create an instance of the class to add:

lstemail.Add(new EmailData
                 {
                     FirstName = "JOhn",
                     LastName = "Smith",
                     Location = "Los Angeles"
                 });

See How to: Initialize Objects by Using an Object Initializer (C# Programming Guide)


Alternatively you could declare a constructor for you EmailData object and use that to create the instance.

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You are attempting to call

List<EmailData>.Add(string,string,string)
. Try this:

lstemail.add(new EmailData{ FirstName="John", LastName="Smith", Location="Los Angeles"});
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How do you expect List<EmailData>.Add to know how to turn three strings into an instance of EmailData? You're expecting too much of the Framework. There is no overload of List<T>.Add that takes in three string parameters. In fact, the only overload of List<T>.Add takes in a T. Therefore, you have to create an instance of EmailData and pass that to List<T>.Add. That is what the above code does.

Try:

lstemail.Add(new EmailData {
    FirstName = "JOhn", 
    LastName = "Smith",
    Location = "Los Angeles"
});

This uses the C# object initialization syntax. Alternatively, you can add a constructor to your class

public EmailData(string firstName, string lastName, string location) {
    this.FirstName = firstName;
    this.LastName = lastName;
    this.Location = location;
}

Then:

lstemail.Add(new EmailData("JOhn", "Smith", "Los Angeles"));
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This line is your problem:

lstemail.Add("JOhn","Smith","Los Angeles");

There is no direct cast from 3 strings to your custom class. The compiler has no way of figuring out what you're trying to do with this line. You need to Add() an instance of the class to lstemail:

lstemail.Add(new EmailData { FirstName = "JOhn", LastName = "Smith", Location = "Los Angeles" });
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The second line won't compile, either - need to specify the property names in an object initializer... –  Reed Copsey Dec 5 '11 at 21:11
    
+0.5 Good explanation, but that's not how the C# object-initialization syntax works. See answers above. :) –  Dan J Dec 5 '11 at 21:11
    
D'oh! That'll teach me to free-hand code without testing it :) –  David Dec 5 '11 at 21:12

You're not adding a new instance of the class to the list. Try this:

lstemail.Add(new EmailData { FirstName="John", LastName="Smith", Location="Los Angeles" });`

List is a generic class. When you specify a List<EmailData>, the Add method is expecting an object that's of type EmailData. The example above, expressed in more verbose syntax, would be:

EmailData data = new EmailData();
data.FirstName="John";
data.LastName="Smith;
data.Location = "Los Angeles";
lstemail.Add(data);
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Here's the extension method version:

public static class ListOfEmailDataExtension
{
    public static void Add(this List<EmailData> list, 
        string firstName, string lastName, string location)
    {
        if (null == list)
            throw new NullReferenceException();

        var emailData = new EmailData
                            {
                                FirstName = firstName, 
                                LastName = lastName, 
                                Location = location
                            };
        list.Add(emailData);
    }
}

Usage:

List<EmailData> myList = new List<EmailData>();
myList.Add("Ron", "Klein", "Israel");
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No need of the null check - list.Add will throw it anyway. –  Sunny Milenov Dec 13 '11 at 14:49
    
@Sunny, I agree, but I still think it's a better practice to check for null value before executing additional code. –  Ron Klein Dec 13 '11 at 20:08

And if you want to create the list with some elements to start with:

var emailList = new List<EmailData>
{
   new EmailData { FirstName = "John", LastName = "Doe", Location = "Moscow" },
   new EmailData {.......}
};
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  public IEnumerable<CustInfo> SaveCustdata(CustInfo cust)
        {
            try
            {
                var customerinfo = new CustInfo
                {
                    Name = cust.Name,
                    AccountNo = cust.AccountNo,
                    Address = cust.Address
                };
                List<CustInfo> custlist = new List<CustInfo>();
                custlist.Add(customerinfo);
                return custlist;
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                return null;
            }
        }
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